Puerto Rico raises Hurricane Maria death toll to 48

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Authorities in Puerto Rico raised the death toll from Hurricane Maria by 3 to 48 on Saturday based on a review of medical records.

The medical examiner concluded that the hurricane was the deciding factor in the three newly disclosed deaths, Secretary of Public Security Hector Pesquera said.

Precise details were not available, but one occurred in the central town of Caguas when a person was unable to get dialysis treatment after the storm knocked out power.

TRUMP WARNS POST-HURRICANE PUERTO RICO, SAYS FEMA WON’T STAY ‘FOREVER’

Another happened in nearby Juncos when a person with undisclosed respiratory problems could not get treatment.

The third occurred in the northern city of Carolina when a person suffering a heart attack was also unable to get treatment.

Pesquera said that the medical examiner is still reviewing all deaths that occurred in island hospitals around the time of the storm and the toll could rise further.

“We are reviewing each and every case to see if the storm was a direct or indirect cause,” he said following a news conference in the capital. “I doubt seriously that we will have any direct at this juncture.”

Maria hit the U.S. island territory Sept. 20 as a category 4 hurricane. The government says about 85 percent of the island remains without power.

FBI IN PUERTO RICO INVESTIGATING MISHANDLING OF FEMA SUPPLIES

Gov. Ricardo Rossello says he is pushing for outside aid to restore electricity and his goal is to have it back for half the island by Nov. 15 and for 95 percent by Dec. 31. But he conceded the task of rebuilding the transmission and distribution network is enormous.

“These are aggressive goals,” Rossello told reporters.

Previously, officials had said it could take as long as March to reach that goal. 

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Jason Aldean resumes tour following Las Vegas tragedy

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Country star Jason Aldean brought the party back Thursday in his return to the stage following the deadly mass shooting that broke out while he was performing in Las Vegas, but the fun was tempered by the sting of the tragedy.

Three songs into his show in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the singer launched into a five-minute speech that honored the 58 killed and nearly 500 hurt in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. But Aldean took a defiant tone in telling concertgoers to resist living in fear, and he called for more of the national unity he’s seen since the attack.

“These people are going to continue to try to hold us down,” Aldean said. “To those people that keep trying to do that, I say (expletive) you, we don’t really care.”

In this photo provided by NBC, Jason Aldean performs "I Won't Back Down" on "Saturday Night Live," Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017, in New York. “Saturday Night Live” has paid tribute to the victims of the Las Vegas mass shooting and the late rock superstar Tom Petty by opening its show with country star Aldean singing one of Petty’s songs.

Jason Aldean performs on ‘SNL’ on Oct. 7, 2017.

 (NBC via AP)

Fans agreed. They pumped their fists and held up American flags as Aldean continued.

“I want to play the show for you guys that the people in Las Vegas came to see and didn’t get a chance to,” he said.

Friends Audra Miller, Lee Holstein and Amanda Zmak were some of those fans. They were in the audience when the shooting happened and ran for cover like thousands of others.

They traveled from Dallas for the Tulsa show and wore T-shirts they decorated themselves that said “Vegas Strong,” a popular meme since the attack.

Miller, 34, said Aldean made them proud and viewed the evening as a triumph.

“It was therapeutic and kind of like a cleansing all at the same time,” she said. “We just wanted to represent family, friends, love and hope.”

Aldean gave fans the show they wanted. The Georgia native is one of country music’s biggest stars, touring in support of his album “They Don’t Know,” which debuted atop the Billboard 200 in 2016. Much of his catalog includes Southern rock, pop and hip-hop influences, a mix of hard-charging party anthems and ballads with lyrics about farm work, drinking and small-town life.

He blasted through hits including “Big Green Tractor,” ”Fly Over States” and “She’s Country,” and popped open a can of beer onstage after the encore.

Aldean canceled shows in California last week to mourn those killed Oct. 1 at the outdoor Route 91 festival. He resumed his tour in an arena where concertgoers walked through metal detectors, and police presence was visible.

The singer visited shooting victims still in a Las Vegas hospital Sunday. The day before, Aldean performed Tom Petty’s “I Won’t Back Down” on “Saturday Night Live” in tribute to the victims and the late rock superstar.

Petty died the day after the shooting in Los Angeles after suffering cardiac arrest.

Authorities have said Stephen Paddock targeted the country music festival, opening fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel before killing himself. They are still trying to determine a motive.

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Tillerson: Trump will scorn but not bolt from Iran nuke deal

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President Donald Trump will say on Friday the Iran nuclear deal is no longer in America’s national security interests, but he won’t withdraw from the landmark 2015 accord or immediately re-impose sanctions, U.S. officials said.

The announcement is essentially a compromise that allows Trump to condemn an accord that he has repeatedly denounced as the worst deal in American history. But he stops well short of torpedoing the pact, which was negotiated over 18 months by the Obama administration, European allies and others.

Instead, Trump will kick the issue over to Congress, asking lawmakers to come up with new legislation that would automatically re-impose sanctions should Iran cross any one of numerous nuclear and non-nuclear “trigger points,” Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster said in remarks released ahead of Trump’s announcement.

Those “trigger points” would include violations of the deal involving illicit atomic work or ballistic missile testing, support for Syrian President Bashar Assad, Lebanon’s Hezbollah movement and other groups that destabilize the region, human rights abuses and cyber warfare, they said.

Congress will have 60 days to decide whether to snap the sanctions back into place, modify the law or do nothing. Any decision to re-impose sanctions would automatically kill America’s participation in the deal.

In a White House speech on Friday afternoon, Trump will notify Congress that he is “decertifying” the deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, arguing that while Iran is complying with the letter of the agreement, the accord itself is not sufficient to be in U.S. interests.

“We don’t dispute that they’re under technical compliance,” Tillerson said. “We’ve said the agreement has a number of weaknesses in it, and, in fact, one of the weaknesses is the standard to remain in technical compliance is not that difficult, or has not been that difficult for them to meet.”

In remarks ahead of his address to a group of conservative voters, Trump previewed his position by calling Iran “a terrorist nation like few others” and urged his audience to listen in.

Both defenders of the Iran nuclear deal and critics are likely to be displeased by Trump’s decision. Those who support the deal believe Trump’s move will badly damage U.S. credibility in future international negotiations, while opponents think he does not go far enough in unraveling the accord.

Trump will urge lawmakers to codify tough new requirements for Tehran to continue to benefit from the sanctions relief that it won in exchange for curbing its atomic program, according to Tillerson. And he’ll announce his long-anticipated intent to impose sanctions on Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps by designating it a terrorist organization under an existing executive order.

“The reckless behavior of the Iranian regime, and the IRGC in particular, poses one of the most dangerous threats to the interests of the United States and to regional stability,” the White House said in a statement. The statement denounced the Obama administration for its “myopic focus on Iran’s nuclear program to the exclusion of the regime’s many other malign activities” and said the same “mistakes” would not be repeated.

Ali Larijani, Iran’s parliament speaker, said Friday that any U.S. move against a nuclear deal with Iran would be an “insult” to the United Nations because the U.N. had given the deal its blessing.

He added that any revision of the deal would allow Iran to take its own actions, and warned that the U.S. move could destabilize the international situation.

“We will continue to adhere to our obligations … for as long as other parties observe the agreement,” he said on a visit to Russia.

In his speech, Trump also will ask Congress to amend or replace legislation that currently requires him to certify Iranian compliance every 90 days. Officials have said that Trump hates the requirement more than the nuclear deal itself because it forces him to take a position every three months on the deal. That frequency hassend also irritated aides who have complained that they are spending inordinate amounts of time on certification at the expense of other issues.

American allies, who have pressed the White House to remain in the nuclear accord, will be closely watching the president’s address. Trump wants to impress on the European parties to the accord — Germany, France and Britain — the importance of fixing what he sees as flaws in the nuclear accord and addressing malign behavior not covered in the agreement.

The Europeans, along with the other parties, Iran, Russia and China, have ruled out reopening the deal. But some, notably France, have signaled a willingness to tackle unresolved issues in supplementary negotiations.

Among those issues are the expiration of several restrictions on advanced nuclear activity under so-called “sunset clauses” that will allow Iran to begin ramping up its enrichment capabilities after 10 years, the end of an arms embargo and the eventual easing of demands for a halt to its missile program.

In the speech, Trump hopes to “recruit” the Europeans into joining his broad strategy, particularly by punishing the Revolutionary Guard, which he and his national security team believe is fomenting instability, violence and extremism throughout the Middle East and beyond, according to one official.

In anticipation of Trump’s announcements, Republican legislators have drawn up a new version of the law replacing the current 90-day timetable with “semi-annual” certifications, according to drafts seen by the Associated Press this week.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman Bob Corker said in a statement on Friday that his panel had agreed to fresh certification criteria to include items that are also the province of the U.N. nuclear watchdog and require the U.S. intelligence community to determine if Iran is carrying out illicit activity in facilities to which the International Atomic Energy Agency has not had access.

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Deb Riechmann contributed to this report.

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AP PHOTOS: 3 rhino calves survive Indian floods, sent to zoo

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Three rhinoceros calves, rescued during monsoon floods over the past two years at a famed wildlife preserve in India’s northeast, were transported Friday to a zoo as part of a conservation program.

The calves, aged 1to 2, were taken by trucks to the zoo in Gauhati, the capital of Assam state, from the Center for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation near Kaziranga National Park, said Tajas Mariswamy, a regional forest officer.

Injured or orphaned wild animals are treated at the center and returned to their natural habitats or to adopted homes.

The Gauhati Zoo already has eight rhinoceroses.

Every year Kaziranga National Park, which has the world’s largest population of more than 2,500 one-horned rhinoceroses as well as many other species, gets flooded by heavy monsoon rains which force animals to move to higher ground. India’s monsoon season runs from June through September.

S.M. Singh, director of the park, said Friday that during this year’s monsoon 32 rhinos died because of floods.

Forest guards rescued seven rhinos with varying injuries and sent them to the center for recovery and rehabilitation.

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Skinny dippers disrupt Massachusetts wedding reception

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A pair of skinny-dippers gave a wedding reception at a scenic Massachusetts restaurant more of a view than expected.

INSTAGRAM STAR ACCIDENTALLY LIVESTREAMS SEX WITH BOYFRIEND

Zachary Tomko tells WHDH-TV he didn’t realize there was a restaurant nearby when he and Holly O’Neil jumped naked into the water at Salisbury Beach on Saturday.

Salisbury Police Chief Thomas Fowler tells The Boston Globe his department received several calls about the nude swimmers from both beachgoers and members of the wedding party.

Fowler says police charged 29-year-old Tomko and 20-year-old O’Neil, of Londonderry, New Hampshire, with disorderly conduct.

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Bride Leah Allen says the swimmers made for a “really interesting wedding day,” and she applauded them for braving the cold water.

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Texas inmate executed for prison guard’s death

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A Texas inmate convicted in the death of a prison guard was put to death Thursday after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected his lawyer’s attempts to halt the execution.

Robert Pruett was given a lethal injection for the December 1999 death of corrections officer Daniel Nagle at a prison southeast of San Antonio. Nagle was repeatedly stabbed with a tape-wrapped metal rod, though an autopsy showed he died from a heart attack that the assault caused.

Prosecutors have said the attack stemmed from a dispute over a peanut butter sandwich that Pruett wanted to take into a recreation yard against prison rules.

The 38-year-old Pruett, who was already serving a 99-year sentence for a neighbor’s killing near Houston when he was convicted in Nagle’s death, lost two appeals at the Supreme Court as his execution neared. He became the 20th prisoner put to death this year in the U.S. and the sixth in Texas, which carries out the death penalty more than any other state. Texas executed seven inmates last year.

Pruett’s lawyers had asked the high court to review whether lower courts properly denied a federal civil rights lawsuit that sought additional DNA testing in his case. They also questioned whether a prisoner like Pruett, who claimed actual innocence in federal court because of newly discovered evidence after exhausting all other appeals, could be put to death.

Pruett avoided execution in April 2015, hours before he could have been taken to the death chamber, when a state judge halted his punishment so additional DNA testing could be conducted on the rod used to stab the 37-year-old Nagle. The new tests showed no DNA on the tape but uncovered DNA on the rod from an unknown female who authorities said likely handled the shank during the appeals process after the original tests in 2002.

Pruett’s attorneys unsuccessfully sought more DNA testing and filed a federal civil rights lawsuit arguing Pruett had been denied due process. The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the lawsuit last week, and the lawyers appealed to the Supreme Court on Tuesday.

Attorneys for Texas told the Supreme Court that Pruett’s appeals were delay tactics after issues were “repeatedly raised” and “properly rejected” by the courts.

No physical evidence tied Pruett to Nagle’s death at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice’s McConnell Unit near Beeville. At his 2002 trial, prisoners testified that they saw Pruett attack Nagle or heard him talk about wanting to kill the guard. According to some of the testimony, he talked about possessing a weapon as well.

Pruett had said he was framed and that Nagle could have been killed by other inmates or corrupt officers at the McConnell Unit.

Pruett’s 99-year murder sentence was for participating with his father and a brother in the 1995 stabbing death of a 29-year-old neighbor, Raymond Yarbrough, at the man’s trailer home in Channelview, just east of Houston. Pruett was 15 when the attack happened.

According to court testimony from a sheriff’s detective, Pruett argued with Yarbrough and then got his father and brother to join him in attacking the man. Pruett punched and kicked Yarbrough and held him down while his father stabbed the man multiple times, the detective said.

Pruett’s father, Howard Pruett, is serving life in prison. His brother, Howard Pruett Jr., was sentenced to 40 years.

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The Latest: Doctor: Speaking clearly hard for burned woman

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The Latest on the trial of a man charged with burning to death a 19-year-old Mississippi woman (all times local):

7:20 p.m.

A doctor says a 19-year-old woman who was found alive with severe burns in Mississippi but later died from her injuries suffered so much damage to her mouth, throat and chest that she would have had trouble clearly saying words.

Dr. William Hickerson testified as an expert witness Thursday in the capital murder trial of Quinton Tellis in Batesville, Mississippi, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) south of Memphis, Tennessee. Prosecutors say Tellis set Chambers and her car on fire and left her to die along a back road in Courtland, Mississippi, in December 2014.

Firefighters who treated a severely burned Chambers on the scene said they heard her say that someone named Eric or Derek set her on fire. Defense attorney Darla Palmer contends that Chambers’ statements show Tellis is falsely accused in the case.

Hickerson testified that Chambers had third-degree burns on most of her body. He said the scorched skin on her chest became tight like leather and she could not speak correctly due to a lack of air.

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12:54 p.m.

A jury in the trial of a man charged with setting a 19-year-old Mississippi woman on fire and leaving her to die along a rural road has visited the road and other key locations in the case.

Prosecutors say Quinton Tellis set Jessica Chambers’ car on fire near a tree farm in Courtland on Dec. 6, 2014. A passing motorist saw Chambers walking down the road and called authorities.

Emergency personnel responded and treated Chambers, who had burns on most of her body. She died at a hospital.

The 29-year-old Tellis faces a murder charge. His lawyer says he has been falsely accused. The 15-person jury visited eight important locations in the investigation Thursday, the trial’s third day.

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5:10 a.m.

A jury in the trial of a man charged with setting a 19-year-old Mississippi woman on fire and leaving her to die along a rural back road is scheduled to visit the crime scene in the case.

Prosecutors say Quinton Tellis set Jessica Chambers’ car on fire near a tree farm in Courtland, Mississippi, on Dec. 6, 2014. A passing motorist saw Chambers walking down the road and called 911.

Emergency personnel responded to the scene and treated Chambers, who had burns on most of her body. She died at a hospital.

The 29-year-old Tellis is on trial on a murder charge in Batesville, Mississippi. His lawyer says he’s falsely accused. The jury is scheduled to visit important locations in the investigation Thursday, the trial’s third day.

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Hotel: Gunman shot at crowd seconds after shooting guard

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Even as investigators struggle to unravel the mystery of what motivated a gunman to open fire on a Las Vegas concert crowd, confusion surrounds the sequence of events in the fatal few minutes of the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

On Thursday, the hotel where gunman Stephen Paddock opened fire from his high-rise hotel suite disputed the official timeline for the Las Vegas massacre and rejected any suggestion hotel officials delayed summoning police for several minutes after the gunman’s initial burst of fire.

It was the latest head-turning change in the investigation that has been frustrating for all involved. Since the Oct. 1 massacre, the timeline of the shooting has changed several times and police and hotel officials can’t seem to agree on the basics of when the shooting happened.

In the most recent chronology given by investigators on Monday, police said Paddock sprayed 200 rounds into the hallway on the 32nd floor Oct. 1, wounding an unarmed security guard in the leg, six minutes before he unleashed his barrage of bullets on the festival crowd. That raised a series of questions about whether officers were given information quickly enough to possibly have a chance to take out the gunman before he could carry out the bloodshed.

But on Thursday, MGM Resorts International, which owns the Mandalay Bay, said it was no more than 40 seconds between the time the guard using his walkie talkie to call for help and Paddock opening fire on the crowd from two windows in his suite.

The 64-year-old high-stakes gambler and real estate investor began his 10-minute attack on the crowd at 10:05 p.m., firing more than 1,000 rounds from his bashed-out windows, police said. Police didn’t arrive on the 32nd floor until 10:17 p.m., two minutes after he had stopped shooting.

The timeline given by police earlier this week differed dramatically from the one they gave last week: that Paddock shot through his door and wounded Campos after the guard distracted him

Hotel officials said the reported time of the hallway shooting, which Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo said happened at 9:59 p.m., came from a report that was manually created after the massacre and “is not accurate.”

A spokesman for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department declined to comment on MGM’s statement.

The hotel said Las Vegas police officers and armed hotel guards immediately responded to the shooting and the company is continuing to cooperate with police.

FBI Director Christopher Wray said investigators haven’t yet determined a motive behind the mass shooting but they’re still digging.

“There’s a lot of effort being put into unraveling this horrific act,” Wray told reporters after a ribbon-cutting for the FBI’s new Atlanta building. “We don’t know yet what the motive is, but that’s not for lack of trying, and if you know anything about the bureau we don’t give up easy.”

Also Thursday, a funeral was held for Erick Silva, a 21-year-old security guard at the festival who was shot in the head while helping people climb over a barricade to escape the gunfire. Dozens of fellow “yellow shirt” security guards were among the hundreds of mourners at the service, where Silva was hailed as a hero.

“We counted on him, and he didn’t let us down,” said his boss, Gina Argento.

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Associated Press writers Ken Ritter and Sally Ho in Las Vegas, Kate Brumback in Atlanta and Michelle Price in Salt Lake City, Utah contributed to this report.

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For complete coverage of the Las Vegas shooting, click here: https://apnews.com/tag/LasVegasmassshooting .

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The Latest: California wildfire destroys Schultz home

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The Latest on wildfires in California (all times local):

4:10 p.m.

California’s deadly wildfires have claimed the home of ‘Peanuts’ creator Charles Schulz but his widow has escaped the flames.

Schulz’s son, Monte Schulz, says a fire on Monday torched the Santa Rosa homes of his stepmother, 78-year-old Jean Schulz, and his brother, Craig Schulz.

She’s staying with other relatives.

Schulz says he’s been told the home where his famous cartoonist father died and all the memorabilia in it are gone.

However, most of his father’s original artwork is in the Charles M. Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa, and so far that’s escaped the flames.

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2:40 p.m.

Authorities in Northern California say at least four people were killed by a wildfire burning in California’s Sierra Nevada foothills, bringing the state’s death toll to 29.

Yuba County Sheriff Steve Durfor confirmed Thursday that the four have died since a blaze ignited there Sunday night.

The fire is burning 100 miles (160 kilometers) north of several blazes in wine country that also broke out Sunday night and that have killed 25 people.

The blaze in the foothills has destroyed more than 100 homes and displaced 2,500 people.

Fire officials say it has charred 16 square miles (41 square kilometers) but fire crews overnight made significant progress and it’s 45 percent contained.

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12:50 p.m.

Officials say progress is being made in some of the largest wildfires burning in Northern California but that the death toll is almost sure to surge.

Fire Chief Ken Pimlott says the number of dead is 26 as of Thursday.

Pimlott says crews have made significant progress against blazes in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada and they’re being redirected to wine country.

He says the fires blackening California’s wine country are threatening dozens of communities and larger cities and that erratic wind gusts are expected in the area starting Friday.

More than 8,000 firefighters are battling the blazes and additional manpower and equipment was pouring in from across the country and as far as Australia and Canada.

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11:15 a.m.

California fire officials are investigating downed power lines and other utility equipment failures as possible causes of massive wildfires sweeping through wine country.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection spokeswoman Janet Upton says it’s unclear if downed power lines and live wires resulted from fires or started them.

She said Thursday that investigators are looking into that and other possible causes.

Jennifer Robison of Pacific Gas and Electric Co. says the utility is focused on restoring power and maintaining safety. She says they will not speculate about the causes of the fires.

She says PG&E will support reviews by any regulator or agency.

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10:15 a.m.

Officials say recovery teams, some with cadaver dogs, will start searching for bodies in some areas devastated by wildfires raging in California wine country.

Sonoma County Sheriff Robert Giordano says officials are investigating hundreds of reports of missing people and that recovery teams will start doing targeted searches for bodies Thursday. He warns that identification may be difficult and take some time.

He says officials have found some bodies almost completely intact but other remains are “nothing more than ash and bones.”

Giordano says at least 14 people have been killed Sonoma County, raising the death toll to 24.

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9:30 a.m.

One of the California counties hard hit by wildfires this week chose not to use one type of emergency alert service to warn residents of possible danger.

Spokeswoman Jennifer Larocque says Sonoma County considered but did not use the Wireless Emergency Alert which sends a widespread message to cell phones and is sometimes likened to an Amber Alert.

Larocque says because of its broad reach officials concluded the message could panic people who were not in danger and trigger unnecessary evacuations that would snarl traffic and delay emergency vehicles.

Sonoma County did use another emergency alert service that texted thousands of warnings to residents to flee Sunday night. However, nearly 80 cellphone towers were knocked out or badly damaged.

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7:55 a.m.

Officials say fire crews have made progress on one of 22 fires burning in Northern California.

Department of Forestry and Fire Protection spokesman Daniel Berlant said Thursday a blaze burning in Napa and Sonoma Counties is 10 percent contained.

But he warns that potential gusty winds forecast to hit the area later in the day could hamper firefighting efforts.

Blazes burning in three other Northern California counties have killed 10 people.

Entire cities have evacuated in anticipation of the next round of flames, their streets empty and the only motion coming from ashes falling like snowflakes.

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7:15 a.m.

A fire official says blazes burning in Northern California grew a bit overnight but it was not as dramatic as prior days.

However, that could change Thursday as winds gusting to 45 mph (72 kph) and dry air are expected to pummel areas north of San Francisco where at least 23 people have died and at least 3,500 homes and businesses have been destroyed.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection spokesman Scott McLean told Oakland television station KTVU that winds were calm early Thursday and firefighters had made some gains overnight.

Thousands of firefighters are battling at least 22 fires spanning more than 265 square miles (686 square kilometers) for a fourth day.

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6:10 a.m.

Officials believe at least 111 rural homes have been destroyed in a wildfire that is chewing through brush and timber on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada in California.

It’s one of more than 20 deadly and destructive fires burning across California.

Yuba County spokesman Russ Brown said Thursday that damage estimates are preliminary and crews have had a hard time getting into mountain communities to survey burn areas.

Brown says overnight winds lessened somewhat, giving firefighters an edge as they beat back the fire that broke out Sunday north of Sacramento.

The blaze that has consumed nearly 19 square miles (49 square kilometers) was 20 percent contained Wednesday night.

At least 23 people have died and thousands of homes have been destroyed in other fires north of San Francisco.

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Berlin probe: Xmas market attacker could have been thwarted

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A special investigator appointed by the German state of Berlin says the Tunisian man who carried out last year’s deadly truck attack on a Christmas market in Berlin could have been detained months earlier.

Anis Amri, a failed asylum-seeker, killed 12 people in the Dec. 19, 2016, attack that was later claimed by the Islamic State group. Public inquiries and German media have since uncovered a series of mistakes by security agencies in tracking a man who authorities believed had posed a public threat.

Bruno Jost, a former federal prosecutor, said Thursday that Amri could have been held for several months for alleged forgery and other crimes when he was detained in southern Germany on July 30, 2016. But Jost said no police agencies familiar with his case reacted to the arrest.

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