First commercial flight lands on remote St Helena

[ad_1]

As seen from inside the cabin, the first ever commercial flight lands at St Helena AirportImage copyright
AFP

Image caption

As seen from inside the cabin, the first ever commercial flight lands at St Helena Airport

The first scheduled commercial airline service to the remote British island of St Helena in the south Atlantic has touched down safely.

The virgin flight, an SA Airlink service from South Africa, ends the island’s long-standing reliance on a ship which sailed every three weeks.

It is hoped that the service, funded by the UK, will boost tourism and help make St Helena more self-sufficient.

But British media have dubbed it “the most useless airport in the world”.

Image copyright
PA

Image caption

The opening of the airport was delayed by problems with wind

Built with £285m ($380m) of funding from the UK Department for International Development (Dfid), the airport should have opened in 2016, but dangerous wind conditions delayed the launch.

After further trials this summer, the weekly service between Johannesburg and St Helena was passed as safe.

Image copyright
AFP

Image caption

One observer said the aircraft made a “perfect landing”

St Helena had for decades been one of the world’s most inaccessible locations, served only by a rare ship service from South Africa.

It is chiefly known as the island to which French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte was exiled after his defeat in the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, and where died.

The Embraer E190-100IGW aircraft took off from Johannesburg on Saturday morning, carrying 78 passengers. It reached St Helena in the afternoon after stopping in the Namibian capital, Windhoek.

“I for one am getting really excited about the new chapter in St Helena’s history,” said St Helena governor Lisa Phillips.

  • Population 4,255

  • Area 122 sq km (47 sq miles)

  • Major language English

  • Major religion Christianity

  • Currency St Helena Pound (equal to British pound)

  • Economy Agriculture, fishing concessions and tourism

BBC

Previously travel to and from the tiny island, with its population of just 4,255, was only possible on the RMS St Helena, which took around six days to complete the journey from South Africa.

The ship’s final voyage is scheduled for February.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionA one-off commercial flight makes a wobbly landing in 2016

St Helena relies on British aid of £52m a year and officials hope increased tourism will make it more self-sufficient.

“This is an important moment in St Helena’s route to self-sufficiency,” a Dfid spokeswoman said.

“It will boost its tourism industry, creating the opportunity to increase its revenues, and will bring other benefits such as quicker access to healthcare for those living on the island.”

According to a report in The Guardian newspaper, the island’s diverse geology and wildlife, such as the whales that gather off its coast, may appeal to visitors.

But “more flights will have to be added if the airport is to be deemed a success – and not an expensive white elephant”, the report said.

Get news from the BBC in your inbox, each weekday morning

[ad_2]

Source link

2018 Honda Accord Hybrid gets rid of the compromises

[ad_1]

Family sedans may be passé in this increasingly crossover SUV-dominated market, but they still offer the best blend of practicality, drivability and economy for your typical small family. And that’s why they still dominate the sales charts. Now, with fuel prices on the rise again, efficiency is returning to prominence. For 2018, the Honda Accord Hybrid offers that efficiency without compromising the other parts of the package.

In earlier Accords, selecting the Hybrid model meant making do with a trunk that yielded to the demands of battery packaging. Those big, heavy cells that provide the electric part of the driveline equation need to live somewhere, and on the 2017 and earlier models they only fit behind the rear seats.

For 2018, the Accord rides on a new chassis that makes room for those batteries beneath the rear seats. The new, smaller lithium-ion battery pack now disappears into the structure of the car, meaning exactly the same 16.7 cubic feet of trunk space as the normal sedan. That’s 0.9 cubic feet up over the 2017 Honda Accord — the non-hybrid. And, with the batteries situated beneath the seats, the Hybrid also gets the same 60/40 split rear seatback.

Up front, a new 2.0-liter, Atkinson-cycle four-cylinder engine provides 143 horsepower and 129 pound-feet of torque, delivering an incredible 40 percent thermal efficiency. That may not sound like much, but it’s Honda’s most efficient production engine ever. That’s paired with an electric motor that boosts total system output to 212 horsepower, 20 more than the base Accord’s 1.5-liter turbocharged four.

Interestingly that hybrid system is configured in series, meaning the car can run entirely on the electric motor and use the gasoline motor just to recharge the batteries, a la the Chevrolet Volt. But, when engine speed or acceleration demands, both motors can work in parallel to provide maximum performance.

2018 Honda Accord Hybrid

That, dear readers, is what we call a big ‘ol trunk. 


Honda

But don’t expect too much on that front. I was able to drive an early version of the 2018 Accord Hybrid and found the acceleration to be on the relaxed side, more than acceptable but lacking the EV-style rush of torque that we’ve come to expect from cars like the Volt. But, this was just a hand-built prototype that had spent the day getting flogged by journalists, so a fresher car with a full battery pack may very well perform better.

The big question, of course, is overall economy and, sadly, that we don’t have an answer for yet. The 2018 Accord in its most efficient configuration, with the 1.5-liter engine and CVT, offers a combined 33 mpg. The 2017 Honda Accord Hybrid manages 48 combined, so don’t be surprised if the new car pushes that figure well into the 50s. Despite that, we should actually see a decrease in price. For 2018 the Accord Hybrid will be available in the base LX trim, losing some interior niceties in exchange for a lower MSRP. 

The 2018 Accord Hybrid hits dealers early next year and, while I was quite impressed by my time behind the wheel of the traditionally powered sedans, if you’re not in a hurry I’m inclined to think the Hybrid will be well worth the wait.

[ad_2]

Source link

10 Sci-Fi Gadgets That Actually Exist



10 Sci-Fi gadgets from movies and entertainment that actually exist now! Subscribe for more Top 10 videos: http://bit.ly/Top10z Hello everyone and welcome to …

source

How do you build the next-generation internet?

[ad_1]

The global internetImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Scientists are now developing an ultra-fast quantum internet that will be partly based on light

Imagine super-fast computers that can solve problems much quicker than machines today. These “quantum computers” are being developed in laboratories around the world. But scientists have already taken the next step, and are thinking about a light-based quantum internet that will have to be just as fast.

It’s not easy to develop technology for a device that hasn’t technically been invented yet, but quantum communications is an attractive field of research because the technology will enable us to send messages that are much more secure.

There are several problems that will need to be solved in order to make a quantum internet possible:

  • Getting quantum computers to talk to each other
  • Making communications secure from hacking
  • Transmitting messages over long distances without losing parts of the message; and
  • Routing messages across a quantum network

What is a quantum computer?

A quantum computer is a machine that is able to crack very tough computation problems with incredible speed – beyond that of today’s “classical” computers.

In conventional computers, the unit of information is called a “bit” and can have a value of either 1 or 0. But its equivalent in a quantum system – the qubit (quantum bit) – can be both 1 and 0 at the same time. This phenomenon opens the door for multiple calculations to be performed simultaneously.

However, qubits need to be synchronised using a quantum effect known as entanglement, which Albert Einstein termed “spooky action at a distance”.

There are four types of quantum computers currently being developed, which use:

  • Light particles
  • Trapped ions
  • Superconducting qubits
  • Nitrogen vacancy centres in diamonds

Quantum computers will enable a multitude of useful applications, such as being able to model many variations of a chemical reaction to discover new medications; developing new imaging technologies for healthcare to better detect problems in the body; or to speed up how we design batteries, new materials and flexible electronics.


Pooling computing power

Quantum computers might be more powerful than classical computers, but some applications will require even more computing power than one quantum computer can provide on its own.

If you can get quantum devices to talk to each other, then you could connect several quantum computers together and pool their power to form one huge quantum computer.

However, since there are four different types of quantum computers being built today, they won’t be all be able to talk to each other without some help.

Some scientists favour a quantum internet based entirely on light particles (photons), while others believe that it would be easier to make quantum networks where light interacts with matter.

“Light is better for communications, but matter qubits are better for processing,” Joseph Fitzsimons, a principal investigator at the National University of Singapore’s Centre of Quantum Technologies tells the BBC.

“You need both to make the network work to establish error correction of the signal, but it can be difficult to make them interact.”

It is very expensive and difficult to store all information in photons, Mr Fitzsimons says, because photons can’t see each other and pass straight by, rather than bouncing off each other. Instead, he believes it would be easier to use light for communications, while storing information using electrons or atoms (in matter).

Quantum encryption

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Quantum encryption will make communications much more secure

One of the key applications of the quantum internet will be quantum key distribution (QKD), whereby a secret key is generated using a pair of entangled photons, and is then used to encrypt information in a way that is impossible for a quantum computer to crack.

This technology already exists, and was first demonstrated in space by a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore and the University of Strathclyde, UK, in December 2015.

But it’s not just the encryption that we will need to build in order to secure our information in the quantum future.

Scientists are also working on “blind quantum computer protocols“, because they allow the user to hide anything they want on a computer.

“You can write something, send it to a remote computer and the person who owns the computer can’t tell anything about it at all except how long it took to run and how much memory it used,” says Mr Fitzsimons.

“This is important because there likely won’t be many quantum computers when they first appear, so people will want to remotely run programs on them, the way we do today in the cloud.”

There are two different approaches to building quantum networks – a land-based network and a space-based network.

Both methods work well for sending regular bits of data across the internet today, but if we want to send data as qubits in the future, it is much more complicated.

To send particles of light (photons), we can use fibre optic cables in the ground. However, the light signal deteriorates over long distances (a phenomenon known as “decoherence”), because fibre optics cables sometimes absorb photons.

It is possible to get around this by building “repeater stations” every 50km. These would essentially be miniature quantum laboratories that would try to repair the signal before sending it on to the next node in the network. But this system would come with its own complexities.

Land or space?

Image copyright
Johannes Handsteiner / ÖAW

Image caption

Artwork: a ground station beams a message contained in a light signal up to the Micius satellite

Then there are space-based networks. Let’s say you want to send a message from the UK to a friend in Australia. The light signal is beamed up from a ground station in the UK, to a satellite with a light source mounted on it.

The satellite sends the light signal to another satellite, which then beams the signal down to a ground station in Australia, and then the message can be transmitted over a ground-based quantum network or classical internet network to the other party.

“Because there’s no air between the satellites, there’s nothing to degrade the signal,” says Dr Jamie Vicary, a senior research fellow at Oxford University’s department of computer science and a member of the Networked Quantum Information Technologies Hub (NQIT).

“If we want to have a really global-scale quantum internet, it looks like a space-based solution is the only way that will work, but it’s the most expensive.”

Quantum teleportation via space has been conducted successfully, and scientists are currently vying to demonstrate longer and longer distances.

Scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences generated headlines in June when they succeeded in teleporting entangled photons between two towns in China located 1,200km apart. They used a specially developed quantum satellite called Micius.

The same Chinese scientists recently topped their own record on 29 September, by demonstrating the world’s first intercontinental video call protected by a quantum key with researchers at the Austrian Academy of Sciences – over a distance of 7,700km.

The call lasted for 20 minutes and the parties were able to exchange encrypted pictures of the Micius satellite and Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger.

Rupert Ursin, senior group leader at the Austrian Academy of Sciences’ Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information believes the quantum internet will need land-based and space-based networks to operate in parallel.

“In the cities, we need a fibre network, but long haul connections will be covered by satellite links,” he explains.


How does quantum key distribution work?

Image copyright
ÖAW

Image caption

The video call between Austrian and Chinese scientists on 29 September 2017

To understand how QKD works, let’s go back to the video call made between the Austrian and Chinese scientists. The Micius satellite used its light source to establish optical links with the ground stations in Austria and the ground stations in China.

It was then able to generate a quantum key.

The great thing about quantum encryption is you can detect whether someone has tried to intercept the message before it got to you, and how many people tried to access it.

Micius was able to tell that the encryption was secure and no one was eavesdropping on the video call. It then gave the go ahead to encrypt the data using the secret key and transmit it over a public internet channel.


Routing messages

Multiple groups of scientists are developing land-based networks by working on the technologies for quantum repeater stations, which are located every 50km, connected by fibre optic cables.

These repeater stations, also known as “quantum network nodes”, will need to perform several actions in order to route, or direct, messages around the network.

First, each node needs to repair and boost the signal that was damaged from the previous 50km stretch of the network.

Imagine that you’re using an old fax machine to send a one-page document to someone else, and each time you send the page, a different part of the message is missing, and the other party has to piece the message together from all the failed attempts.

This is similar to how a single message may have to be sent between different nodes on a quantum network.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Fibre optic cables will be used for land-based quantum networks

There will be many people on the network, all trying to talk to each other. So the node, or repeater station, will also have to figure out how to distribute its available computing power in order to piece together all the messages being sent. It will also have to send messages between the quantum internet and the classical internet.

The University of Delft is building a quantum network using nitrogen vacancies in diamonds, and it has so far shown the ability to store and distribute the links needed for quantum communications over quite large distances.

The University of Oxford and the University of Maryland are both currently building quantum computers that work in a similar way to a network. Their quantum computers consist of trapped ion nodes that have been networked together to talk to each other.

The bigger the computer you want, the more nodes you have to add, but this type of quantum computer only transmits data over a short distance.

“We want to make them small so they can be well-protected from decoherence, but if they’re small then they can’t hold many qubits,” says Dr Vicary.

“If we connect the nodes up in a network, then we can still have a quantum computer without being limited by the number of qubits, while still protecting the nodes.”

Quantum memory

The repeater station will also need to have a quantum memory chip. The nodes create “links”, which consist of entangled pairs of light particles. These entangled pairs are prepared in advance.

While the node calculates the route across the network that the message will need to take, it needs to store the entangled pair of photons somewhere safe, so a quantum memory chip is needed. It has to be able to store the photons for as long as possible.

Image copyright
Stuart Hay, ANU

Image caption

Dr Rose Ahlefeldt and associate professor Matthew Sellars operate a high-resolution dye laser to study rare earth crystals at ANU

Researchers from the Australian National University (ANU) have developed a telecom-compatible quantum memory chip using an erbium-doped crystal. This device is able to store light in the right colour and it is able to do so for longer than one second, which is 10,000 times longer than all other attempts so far.

“The biggest challenge is now to demonstrate a quantum memory with a large data storage capacity,” associate professor Matthew Sellars, program manager in the Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) at ANU tells the BBC.

“It will be the memory’s storage capacity that will limit the data transmission rate through the network.

“I think it will take about five years before the technology [for the quantum internet] is practical.”

[ad_2]

Source link

‘Road Trippin’ Will Continue, With Or Without Richard Jefferson

[ad_1]

‘Road Trippin’ Will Continue, With Or Without Richard Jefferson

Getty Image

The Richard Jefferson era in Cleveland has come and gone after the Cavaliers traded Jefferson to the Atlanta Hawks on Friday. Ultimately, the Cavaliers needed a roster spot for Dwyane Wade, and unfortunately, Jefferson was the odd man out.

The on-court impact of Jefferson leaving the Cavaliers deserves its own discussion at some point, but at 37-years old, it’s conceivable that the off-court impact Jefferson had on the team was a lot more important. Jefferson’s excellent presence in the Cavs locker room culminated in the creation of the Road Trippin’ podcast featuring Jefferson, teammate Channing Frye, and Fox Sports Ohio reporter Allie Clifton.

Through 50 episodes of Road Trippin’, Jefferson, Frye, and Clifton brought Cavaliers fans closer to an NBA locker room than anything we’ve ever seen before, with everything from in-depth basketball conversations to impromptu guest appearances by random Cavaliers employees. It was equal parts unique and terrific.




Quantcast








‘;e.displayMessage=t,e.replaceContent=n,Object.defineProperty(e,”__esModule”,{value:!0})})},{}],25:[function(e,t,n){!function(e){“performance”in e||(e.performance={});var t=e.performance;e.performance.now=t.now||t.mozNow||t.msNow||t.oNow||t.webkitNow||Date.now||function(){return(new Date).getTime()}}(self)},{}],26:[function(e,t,n){t.exports=[“com”,”net”,”fr”,”co.uk”,”de”,”tv”,”today”,”org”,”info”,”ie”,”ba”,”gg”,”co.nz”]},{}],27:[function(e,t,n){“use strict”;var r=e(28),o={};o.rules=e(26).map(function(e){return{rule:e,suffix:e.replace(/^(*.|!)/,””),wildcard:”*”===e.charAt(0),exception:”!”===e.charAt(0)}}),o.endsWith=function(e,t){return-1!==e.indexOf(t,e.length-t.length)},o.findRule=function(e){var t=r.toASCII(e);return o.rules.reduce(function(e,n){var i=r.toASCII(n.suffix);return o.endsWith(t,”.”+i)||t===i?n:e},null)},n.errorCodes={DOMAIN_TOO_SHORT:”Domain name too short.”,DOMAIN_TOO_LONG:”Domain name too long. It should be no more than 255 chars.”,LABEL_STARTS_WITH_DASH:”Domain name label can not start with a dash.”,LABEL_ENDS_WITH_DASH:”Domain name label can not end with a dash.”,LABEL_TOO_LONG:”Domain name label should be at most 63 chars long.”,LABEL_TOO_SHORT:”Domain name label should be at least 1 character long.”,LABEL_INVALID_CHARS:”Domain name label can only contain alphanumeric characters or dashes.”},o.validate=function(e){var t=r.toASCII(e);if(t.length255)return”DOMAIN_TOO_LONG”;for(var n,o=t.split(“.”),i=0;i63)return”LABEL_TOO_LONG”;if(“-“===n.charAt(0))return”LABEL_STARTS_WITH_DASH”;if(“-“===n.charAt(n.length-1))return”LABEL_ENDS_WITH_DASH”;if(!/^[a-z0-9-]+$/.test(n))return”LABEL_INVALID_CHARS”}},n.parse=function(e){if(“string”!=typeof e)throw new TypeError(“Domain name must be a string.”);var t=e.slice(0).toLowerCase();”.”===t.charAt(t.length-1)&&(t=t.slice(0,t.length-1));var i=o.validate(t);if(i)return{input:e,error:{message:n.errorCodes[i],code:i}};var a={input:e,tld:null,sld:null,domain:null,subdomain:null,listed:!1},c=t.split(“.”);if(“local”===c[c.length-1])return a;var u=function(){return/xn--/.test(t)?(a.domain&&(a.domain=r.toASCII(a.domain)),a.subdomain&&(a.subdomain=r.toASCII(a.subdomain)),a):a},s=o.findRule(t);if(!s)return c.length1&&(r=n[0]+”@”,e=n[1]),e=e.replace(I,”.”),r+i(e.split(“.”),t).join(“.”)}function c(e){for(var t,n,r=[],o=0,i=e.length;o=55296&&t65535&&(e-=65536,t+=H(e>>>10&1023|55296),e=56320|1023&e),t+=H(e)}).join(“”)}function s(e){return e-48>1,e+=M(e/t);e>N*S>>1;r+=E)e=M(e/N);return M(r+(N+1)*e/(e+T))}function f(e){var t,n,r,i,a,c,l,f,p,h,g=[],v=e.length,b=0,_=P,w=A;for(n=e.lastIndexOf(C),n=128&&o(“not-basic”),g.push(e.charCodeAt(r));for(i=n>0?n+1:0;i=v&&o(“invalid-input”),f=s(e.charCodeAt(i++)),(f>=E||f>M((y-b)/c))&&o(“overflow”),b+=f*c,p=l=w+S?S:l-w,!(f

M(y/h)&&o(“overflow”),c*=h;t=g.length+1,w=d(b-a,t,0==a),M(b/t)>y-_&&o(“overflow”),_+=M(b/t),b%=t,g.splice(b++,0,_)}return u(g)}function p(e){var t,n,r,i,a,u,s,f,p,h,g,v,b,_,w,m=[];for(e=c(e),v=e.length,t=P,n=0,a=A,u=0;u=t&&gM((y-n)/b)&&o(“overflow”),n+=(s-t)*b,t=s,u=0;uy&&o(“overflow”),g==t){for(f=n,p=E;h=p=a+S?S:p-a,!(f= 0x80 (not a basic code point)”,”invalid-input”:”Invalid input”},N=E-O,M=Math.floor,H=String.fromCharCode;if(w={version:”1.4.1″,ucs2:{decode:c,encode:u},decode:f,encode:p,toASCII:g,toUnicode:h},v&&b)if(t.exports==v)b.exports=w;else for(m in w)w.hasOwnProperty(m)&&(v[m]=w[m]);else r.punycode=w}(this)}).call(this,”undefined”!=typeof global?global:”undefined”!=typeof self?self:”undefined”!=typeof window?window:{})},{}],29:[function(e,t,n){!function(e,r){“object”==typeof n&&void 0!==t?r(n):”function”==typeof define&&define.amd?define([“exports”],r):r(e.ulog=e.ulog||{})}(this,function(e){“use strict”;function t(e){var t=Object.create(console);[“assert”,”trace”,”debug”,”log”,”info”,”warn”,”error”].forEach(function(n){e[n]=t[n]})}function n(e,n){var r=i[n];void 0!==r&&(t(e),r>0&&(e.assert=function(){}),r>5&&(e.trace=function(){}),r>10&&(e.debug=function(){}),r>20&&(e.log=function(){}),r>30&&(e.info=function(){}),r>40&&(e.warn=function(){}),r>50&&(e.error=function(){}))}function r(e,t){t=t||{},n(e,t.level||”debug”)}function o(e){var t=Object.create(console);return r(t,e),t}var i={all:0,trace:5,debug:10,log:20,info:30,warn:40,error:50,none:1e3},a=o();e.LEVELS=i,e.setLevel=n,e.configure=r,e.create=o,e.logger=a,Object.defineProperty(e,”__esModule”,{value:!0})})},{}]},{},[21]);

[ad_2]

Source link

10 Wrestling Matches That Turned Into REAL Fights



Top 10 WWE matches that went to far and became real life fights Subscribe to TheSportster http://goo.gl/mZKUfd For copyright matters please contact us at: …

source

Penguin Random House to Publish ‘Cleo & Cuquin’ Books – Variety

[ad_1]

One of the world’s leading trade publishers, Penguin Random House, will publish the children’s books series based on “Cleo & Cuquin,” a pre-school transmedia brand from Madrid-based Ánima Kitchent and Mexico’s Televisa.

The books will be released in Spain and Latin America by spring 2018. Also produced by Ánima Kitchent, but in co-production with Famosa, the audiovisual subsidiary of the toy maker Famosa, “Piny, Institute of New York” will count on U.K.’s ITV Studios Global Entertainment (ITVS GE) as licensing agent in the U.K., where Sony Pop is airing the series. “Piny” has already been broadcast in France (Gulli), Italy (Frisbee), Portugal (Disney Channel), Russia (Carousel TV) and Turkey (MCD Kidz).

Toy maker Clementoni will launch a line of “Cleo & Cuquin”-based toys in Spain in fall 2018 including puzzles, edukit toy cases and electronic games. Clementoni will support toy manufacturing giant Mattel, recently appointed global toy master for “Cleo & Cuquin,” a 52-episode seven-minutes TV show.

The new deal on “Cleo & Cuquin” marks the first time a Spanish company has established a licensing deal with a global toy master or a publisher such as Random House, according to Ánima Estudios CEO Víctor López who also commented that it on “Piny” it was “a great achievement” to have reached an agreement to join forces with ITV and Sony POP in the largest European market for licensing.”

Pre-school toon series “Cleo & Cuquin” is also co-produced by Barcelona-based Selecta Visión and the Moro Family’s company MAI. An adaptation of the legendary Spanish hit “Telerin Family,” a cartoon and daily jingle broadcast in which where six siblings tell children that it’s time to go to bed. It became a popular success in Spain and Mexico during the ’70s and ‘80s, coloring the now nostalgic childhood of a generation of newish parents and young grandparents.

The new brand will also include a bedtime app, web content and music video clips. Launched one year ago on the Famila Telerín’s YouTube channel, “Cleo & Cuquin’s” 17 music video clips have scored 600 million views and 1.5 million subscribers.

“Piny” re-creates the life in an unusual New York educational center which focuses on creativity, fashion and careers of the future. Series centers on Piny –the janitor’s daughter at this elite high school. A 52-episode toon TV show, “Piny” targets 6-8s.

A joint-venture founded by Latin American animation powerhouse Ánima Estudios with former executives at Spanish toon company Vodka Capital, Ánima Kitchent was launched in 2014.

In addition to Ánima Kitchent, the Spanish delegation attending this weekend’s 25th MipJunior under the umbrella Animation from Spain includes Baleuko, Ficción Producciones, Imira Ent., Motion Pictures, Pausoka Entertainment, Planeta Junior, Peekaboo Animation, Rokyn Animation, pubcasters TV3 and TVE, and Zinkia.

[ad_2]

Source link