‘Civil Disobedience’ March From Charlottesville to DC Will Demand Trump’s Removal

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Protesters are planning a march starting from Charlottesville, Virginia to Washington, D.C. to fight white supremacy and demand that President Trump be removed from office.

“The March to Confront White Supremacy” will spend ten days starting on Monday, August 28 travelling to the nation’s capitol and then occupy it with non-violent demonstrations.

“For years, white supremacist violence, rhetoric, and policies have escalated and intensified – exploding during Donald Trump’s run for president and reaching a boiling point in Charlottesville,” the website for the event reads.

White nationalist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia turned violent earlier this month, leaving one dead and the nation reeling. Although President Trump repeatedly condemned the white supremacist and Nazi ideologies of the rioters, some on the left are still convinced he is racist.


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“We demand that President Trump to be removed from office for allying himself with this ideology of hate and we demand an agenda that repairs the damage it’s done to our country and its people,” the march organizers wrote. 

“This will be a sustained civil disobedience campaign, so bring what you need to stay,” they continued.

Several demonstrations against Nazi and KKK ideologies have taken place since Charlottesville, including a march in Boston and one group’s toppling of a Confederate statue in Durham, NC.


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Venezuelan army, civil militias hold exercises after Trump threat

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CARACAS (Reuters) – Venezuela held nationwide armed forces exercises on Saturday, calling on civilians to join reserve units to defend against a possible attack after U.S. President Donald Trump warned that a “military option” was on the table for the crisis-hit country.

Trump made the threat two weeks ago and on Friday he signed an order prohibiting dealings in new debt from the Venezuelan government or its oil company, a move to hobble financing that Trump says is fuelling socialist President Nicolas Maduro’s “dictatorship.”

“Against the belligerent threats of the United States, all Venezuelans between the ages of 18 and 60 are required to contribute to the integral defence of the nation,” said an announcement broadcast early on Saturday on state television.

Maduro used Trump’s threat to try to energize his political base, broadcasting images of rifle-carrying civilians negotiating obstacle courses and learning hand-to-hand combat. The government created the hashtag #EsHoraDeDefenderLaPatria, which translates as “It’s Time To Defend The Homeland,” to promote the exercises.

TV images showed Venezuelans young and old entering military reserve registration centres. But there was no evidence that registration reached far beyond government employees and Maduro’s Socialist Party loyalists.

Scenes were aired of camouflaged sharp-shooters firing their weapons while military commanders gave fiery speeches at “anti-imperialist” rallies. More exercises were scheduled for Sunday.

Civilians and members of the National Bolivarian Armed Forces parade during a military exercise in Caracas, Venezuela, August 26, 2017.Andres Martinez Casares

Opposition figure and former presidential candidate Henrique Capriles sent a tweet dismissing the weekend training programme as an expensive farce. He said Maduro should focus instead on bringing down Venezuela’s high crime rate.

Diplomatic tensions increased last month when a legislative superbody called the constituent assembly was elected at Maduro’s behest. It has the power to legislate, bypassing the opposition-controlled congress.

Maduro says the new assembly is Venezuela’s only hope of restoring peace after months of deadly anti-government protests.

Leaders of the fractious opposition coalition boycotted the July 30 election of the assembly, branding it an affront to democracy. They called for an early presidential election, which Maduro would likely lose as his popularity sinks along with an economy blighted by triple-digit inflation and food shortages.

Trump’s threat of military action played into Maduro’s hands by supporting his oft-repeated assertion that the U.S. “empire” has been waging economic war on Venezuela and wants to invade the country to steal its vast oil reserves.

The idea had been laughed off as absurd by opposition and U.S. officials before Trump said on Aug. 11 that “a military option is certainly something we could pursue” as a way of ending Venezuela’s crisis.

Reporting by Hugh Bronstein; Additional reporting by Deisy Buitrago and Johnny Carvajal; Editing by Andrew Hay and Paul Simao

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Roger Stone Says Impeach Trump, Get Ready for Civil War

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Roger Stone

Impeach Trump …

Get Ready for Civil War

8/24/2017 6:30 AM PDT

EXCLUSIVE

Roger Stone, a former Trump campaign advisor who still counsels the President says if Congress impeaches Donald Trump, there will be all-out war in the U.S.

We got Stone at LAX Wednesday and he warned any politician who’s thinking of voting for impeachment to think again, because their lives would be in danger.

He goes on to say “both sides” are heavily armed and bloodshed would be inevitable.

Some members of Congress, including Rep. Maxine Waters, are already pushing hard for articles of impeachment.

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This is CNN: Don Lemon accuses Trump of inciting ‘civil war’

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A CNN host accused President Trump of “trying to ignite a civil war” following his raucous speech to a rally in Arizona in which the commander-in-chief blasted the news network and defended his response to racial strife in Virginia.

Don Lemon, host of “CNN Tonight,” made the remark before a  packed panel of anti-Trumpers assembled to react to the president’s speech in Phoenix.

“He has given oxygen to racists,” Lemon said. “He hasn’t really said anything [to] denounce the alt-right … He is clearly trying to ignite a civil war in this country. He has not tamped down race.”

Lemon’s guests all heartily concurred, and the discussion moved on to speculation about Trump’s mental health, an increasingly  recurring theme on CNN.

“It was an astounding chain of lies tied together by lunatic asides by a man who obviously is mentally unstable,” Republican political consultant Rick Wilson said, adding it was “Castro-esque” and calling him “bat crap crazy.”

Democratic strategist Maria Cardona applauded the “majority of Americans who did not vote for this man.”

“Tonight, Don, America’s enemies are laughing and America, the country, is weeping and we need to do something about it,” Cardona said.

Later in the show, James Clapper, former director of national intelligence and now CNN national security analyst, echoed similar sentiments about the president.

“I don’t know when I’ve listened and watched something like this from a president that I’ve found more disturbing,” Clapper said, adding that it was “downright scary.”

“This behavior and this divisiveness, intellectual and moral and ethical void that the president of the United States exhibits,” Clapper said. “And how much longer does the country—to borrow a phrase—endure this nightmare?”

Trump’s remarks in Phoenix were reminiscent of candidate-Trump on the campaign trail, slamming the media over its coverage of his presidency—specifically noting his response to recent violence in Charlottesville, Va.

“They are sick people,” Trump said of the media. “You know the thing I don’t understand? You would think … they’d want to make our country great again. And I honestly believe they don’t.”

Trump continued to trash the media’s coverage of him, calling out CNN and saying “you wonder why CNN is doing poorly,” as the crowd chanted “CNN sucks!”

The president has repeatedly slammed CNN as “Fake News,” and in May, called Lemon “perhaps the dumbest person in broadcasting.” 

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Dick Gregory, comedian and civil rights activist, dies

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Dick Gregory, the comedian and activist and who broke racial barriers in the 1960s and used his humor to spread messages of social justice and nutritional health, has died. He was 84.

Gregory died late Saturday in Washington, D.C. after being hospitalized for about a week, his son Christian Gregory told The Associated Press. He had suffered a severe bacterial infection.

As one of the first black standup comedians to find success with white audiences, in the early 1960s, Gregory rose from an impoverished childhood in St. Louis to win a college track scholarship and become a celebrated satirist who deftly commented upon racial divisions at the dawn of the civil rights movement.

“Where else in the world but America,” he joked, “could I have lived in the worst neighborhoods, attended the worst schools, rode in the back of the bus, and get paid $5,000 a week just for talking about it?”

Gregory’s sharp commentary soon led him into civil rights activism, where his ability to woo audiences through humor helped bring national attention to fledgling efforts at integration and social equality for blacks.

Democratic Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey tweeted, “Dick Gregory’s unflinching honesty & courage, inspired us to fight, live, laugh & love despite it all.” A tweet by actress/comedian Whoopi Goldberg said, “About being black in America Dick Gregory has passed away, Condolences to his family and to us who won’t have his insight 2 lean on R.I.P”

Gregory briefly sought political office, running unsuccessfully for mayor of Chicago in 1966 and U.S. president in 1968, when he got 200,000 votes as the Peace and Freedom party candidate. In the late ’60s, he befriended John Lennon and was among the voices heard on Lennon’s anti-war anthem “Give Peace a Chance,” recorded in the Montreal hotel room where Lennon and Yoko Ono were staging a “bed-in” for peace.

An admirer of Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., Gregory embraced nonviolence and became a vegetarian and marathon runner.

He preached about the transformative powers of prayer and good health. Once an overweight smoker and drinker, he became a trim, energetic proponent of liquid meals and raw food diets. In the late 1980s, he developed and distributed products for the popular Slim-Safe Bahamian Diet.

When diagnosed with lymphoma in 2000, he fought it with herbs, exercise and vitamins. It went in remission a few years later.

He took a break from performing in comedy clubs, saying the alcohol and smoke in the clubs were unhealthy and focused on lecturing and writing more than a dozen books, including an autobiography and a memoir.

Gregory went without solid food for weeks to draw attention to a wide range of causes, including Middle East peace, American hostages in Iran, animal rights, police brutality, the Equal Rights Amendment for women and to support pop singer Michael Jackson when he was charged with sexual molestation in 2004.

“We thought I was going to be a great athlete, and we were wrong, and I thought I was going to be a great entertainer, and that wasn’t it either. I’m going to be an American Citizen. First class,” he once said.

Richard Claxton Gregory was born in 1932, the second of six children. His father abandoned the family, leaving his mother poor and struggling. Though the family often went without food or electricity, Gregory’s intellect and hard work quickly earned him honors, and he attended the mostly white Southern Illinois University.

“In high school I was fighting being broke and on relief,” he wrote in his 1963 book. “But in college, I was fighting being Negro.”

He started winning talent contests for his comedy, which he continued in the Army. After he was discharged, he struggled to break into the standup circuit in Chicago, working odd jobs as a postal clerk and car washer to survive. His breakthrough came in 1961, when he was asked to fill in for another comedian at Chicago’s Playboy Club. His audience, mostly white Southern businessmen, heckled him with racist gibes, but he stuck it out for hours and left them howling.

That job was supposed to be a one-night gig, but lasted two months — and landed him a profile in Time magazine and a spot on “The Tonight Show.”

Vogue magazine, in February 1962, likened him to Will Rogers and Fred Allen: “bright and funny and topical … (with) a way of making the editorials in The New York Times seem the cinch stuff from which smash night-club routines are rightfully made.” ”I’ve got to go up there as an individual first, a Negro second,” he said in Phil Berger’s book, “The Last Laugh: The World of Stand-up Comics.” ”I’ve got to be a colored funny man, not a funny colored man.”

His political passions were never far from his mind — and they hurt his comedy career. The nation was grappling with the civil rights movement, and it was not at all clear that racial integration could be achieved. At protest marches, he was repeatedly beaten and jailed.

He remained active on the comedy scene until recently, when he fell ill and canceled an August 9 show in San Jose, California, followed by an August 15 appearance in Atlanta. On social media, he wrote that he felt energized by the messages from his well-wishers, and said he was looking to get back on stage because he had a lot to say about the racial tension brought on by the gathering of hate groups in Virginia.

“We have so much work still to be done, the ugly reality on the news this weekend proves just that,” he wrote.

He is survived by his wife, Lillian, and 10 children.

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Dick Gregory, comedian and civil rights activist, dies

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Dick Gregory, the comedian and activist and who broke racial barriers in the 1960s and used his humor to spread messages of social justice and nutritional health, has died. He was 84.

Gregory died late Saturday in Washington, D.C. after being hospitalized for about a week, his son Christian Gregory told The Associated Press. He had suffered a severe bacterial infection.

As one of the first black standup comedians to find success with white audiences, in the early 1960s, Gregory rose from an impoverished childhood in St. Louis to win a college track scholarship and become a celebrated satirist who deftly commented upon racial divisions at the dawn of the civil rights movement.

“Where else in the world but America,” he joked, “could I have lived in the worst neighborhoods, attended the worst schools, rode in the back of the bus, and get paid $5,000 a week just for talking about it?”

Gregory’s sharp commentary soon led him into civil rights activism, where his ability to woo audiences through humor helped bring national attention to fledgling efforts at integration and social equality for blacks.

Democratic Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey tweeted, “Dick Gregory’s unflinching honesty & courage, inspired us to fight, live, laugh & love despite it all.” A tweet by actress/comedian Whoopi Goldberg said, “About being black in America Dick Gregory has passed away, Condolences to his family and to us who won’t have his insight 2 lean on R.I.P”

Gregory briefly sought political office, running unsuccessfully for mayor of Chicago in 1966 and U.S. president in 1968, when he got 200,000 votes as the Peace and Freedom party candidate. In the late ’60s, he befriended John Lennon and was among the voices heard on Lennon’s anti-war anthem “Give Peace a Chance,” recorded in the Montreal hotel room where Lennon and Yoko Ono were staging a “bed-in” for peace.

An admirer of Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., Gregory embraced nonviolence and became a vegetarian and marathon runner.

He preached about the transformative powers of prayer and good health. Once an overweight smoker and drinker, he became a trim, energetic proponent of liquid meals and raw food diets. In the late 1980s, he developed and distributed products for the popular Slim-Safe Bahamian Diet.

When diagnosed with lymphoma in 2000, he fought it with herbs, exercise and vitamins. It went in remission a few years later.

He took a break from performing in comedy clubs, saying the alcohol and smoke in the clubs were unhealthy and focused on lecturing and writing more than a dozen books, including an autobiography and a memoir.

Gregory went without solid food for weeks to draw attention to a wide range of causes, including Middle East peace, American hostages in Iran, animal rights, police brutality, the Equal Rights Amendment for women and to support pop singer Michael Jackson when he was charged with sexual molestation in 2004.

“We thought I was going to be a great athlete, and we were wrong, and I thought I was going to be a great entertainer, and that wasn’t it either. I’m going to be an American Citizen. First class,” he once said.

Richard Claxton Gregory was born in 1932, the second of six children. His father abandoned the family, leaving his mother poor and struggling. Though the family often went without food or electricity, Gregory’s intellect and hard work quickly earned him honors, and he attended the mostly white Southern Illinois University.

“In high school I was fighting being broke and on relief,” he wrote in his 1963 book. “But in college, I was fighting being Negro.”

He started winning talent contests for his comedy, which he continued in the Army. After he was discharged, he struggled to break into the standup circuit in Chicago, working odd jobs as a postal clerk and car washer to survive. His breakthrough came in 1961, when he was asked to fill in for another comedian at Chicago’s Playboy Club. His audience, mostly white Southern businessmen, heckled him with racist gibes, but he stuck it out for hours and left them howling.

That job was supposed to be a one-night gig, but lasted two months — and landed him a profile in Time magazine and a spot on “The Tonight Show.”

Vogue magazine, in February 1962, likened him to Will Rogers and Fred Allen: “bright and funny and topical … (with) a way of making the editorials in The New York Times seem the cinch stuff from which smash night-club routines are rightfully made.” ”I’ve got to go up there as an individual first, a Negro second,” he said in Phil Berger’s book, “The Last Laugh: The World of Stand-up Comics.” ”I’ve got to be a colored funny man, not a funny colored man.”

His political passions were never far from his mind — and they hurt his comedy career. The nation was grappling with the civil rights movement, and it was not at all clear that racial integration could be achieved. At protest marches, he was repeatedly beaten and jailed.

He remained active on the comedy scene until recently, when he fell ill and canceled an August 9 show in San Jose, California, followed by an August 15 appearance in Atlanta. On social media, he wrote that he felt energized by the messages from his well-wishers, and said he was looking to get back on stage because he had a lot to say about the racial tension brought on by the gathering of hate groups in Virginia.

“We have so much work still to be done, the ugly reality on the news this weekend proves just that,” he wrote.

He is survived by his wife, Lillian, and 10 children.

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Dick Gregory, Groundbreaking Comedian and Civil Rights Activist, Dies at 84

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Us Entertainer/activist Dick Gregory Receives a

Prommer/Epa/REX/Shutterstock

Dick Gregory, the pioneering standup comedian and civil rights activist who made his advocacy work a key component of his on-stage persona, died Saturday night in Washington, D.C. He was 84.

Gregory’s death was confirmed by his family in an Instagram post.

“The family appreciates the outpouring of support and love and respectfully asks for their privacy as they grieve during this very difficult time,” read the post from son Christian Gregory.

Gregory was active on the standup and public speaking circuit on and off for more than a half-century. He had been making comedy appearances until he was hospitalized on Aug. 9.

Gregory recently released a new book, “Defining Moments in Black History: Reading Between the Lies,” and he penned a guest column for Variety on how communities can band together to end police brutality. In June, Gregory was the subject of a lengthy profile on “CBS Sunday Morning.” Actor Joe Morton explored the ups and downs of Gregory’s standup career in the one-man show “Turn Me Loose,” which ran in New York last year.

Gregory made his mark in the early 1960s as a rare African-American comedian who was successful in nightclubs geared to white audiences. One important break famously came in 1960 when he was invited by Playboy founder Hugh Hefner to perform at his Playboy Lounge in Chicago.

Gregory was known for his folksy delivery and for incorporating commentary about segregation and discrimination into his routines. During this period he released a number of successful spoken word albums, notably 1961’s “In Living Black and White,” 1962’s “Talks Turkey,” 1964’s “So You See … We All Have Problems,” and 1968’s “The Two Sides of Dick Gregory.” In 1964, he published an autobiography with the provocative title: “N—-: An Autobiography.”

By the mid-1960s, after his friend and fellow activist Medgar Evers was murdered, Gregory turned his focus to full-time work as an activist with Martin Luther King Jr. and others. He was a vocal advocate for the rights of African-Americans and Native Americans, and he was an early opponent of the Vietnam War and South Africa’s apartheid. Gregory also tried his hand at politics, running unsuccessfully for mayor of Chicago in 1967 and mounting a presidential bid in 1968.

In a recent post that was widely circulated on social media, Gregory addressed the current flare-up of tensions in race relations, but he counseled younger activists to appreciate the gains that have come and to be mindful of history.

“Love will always be triumphant over hate,” Gregory wrote. “I have seen progress like most cannot appreciate because they were not there to bear witness. … The reality is far from perfect, but profoundly better than what daily reality was for my generation.”

A native of St. Louis, Gregory was one of six children who were abandoned in childhood by their father. He became a track star in high school, which led him to a scholarship at Southern Illinois University in 1951. He left the school after his mother died in 1953 and was drafted into the Army. His comedy career was kindled during his time in the service, where he first performed in talent shows and variety shows.

In the 1970s, after his weight ballooned to 350 pounds, Gregory became active in the cause of world hunger and nutritional advocacy, as well as spiritual awareness of the mind-body connection. He developed a popular weight-loss regimen known as the Bahamian diet, and for a time had his own line of nutritional supplements. In 1981, he endured a medically supervised 70-day fast at a hospital in New Orleans.

Gregory was a frequent presence on the talk show and late-night comedy circuit during his 1960s heyday. But he logged only a few acting roles during his long career. He had guest shots in two episodes of Comedy Central’s “Reno 911” in 2004. He had a role in the 1995 Mario Van Peebles film “Panther” as an activist minister and a cameo in the 2002 Rob Schneider vehicle “The Hot Chick.”

A prolific writer, Gregory’s other books included “Up From N—–“, “No More Lies,” and “Callus on My Soul.” He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2015.

Gregory is survived by his wife of 58 years, Lillian, and 10 children.

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Civil Rights Activist and Comedian Dick Gregory Dead at 84

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Dick Gregory

Dead at 84

8/19/2017 7:39 PM PDT

Breaking News

Dick Gregory — comedian, actor, writer and famed civil right activist — died Saturday night in Washington D.C. … according to a statement from his family.

Gregory began his career as a comedian while serving in the the military in the ’50s, and went on to be a prominent figure during the Civil Rights Movement in the ’60s … which his comedy and political satire reflected.

Dick was also a writer known for the documentary “Joe Louis: America’s Hero… Betrayed.” Comedy Central named him #82 on the all time list of greatest stand-up comedians.

The comedic and civil rights legend was recently hospitalized for an unknown but serious condition. According to his rep, he died from heart failure.

Dick was 84.

RIP

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