‘Road Trippin’ Will Continue, With Or Without Richard Jefferson

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‘Road Trippin’ Will Continue, With Or Without Richard Jefferson

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The Richard Jefferson era in Cleveland has come and gone after the Cavaliers traded Jefferson to the Atlanta Hawks on Friday. Ultimately, the Cavaliers needed a roster spot for Dwyane Wade, and unfortunately, Jefferson was the odd man out.

The on-court impact of Jefferson leaving the Cavaliers deserves its own discussion at some point, but at 37-years old, it’s conceivable that the off-court impact Jefferson had on the team was a lot more important. Jefferson’s excellent presence in the Cavs locker room culminated in the creation of the Road Trippin’ podcast featuring Jefferson, teammate Channing Frye, and Fox Sports Ohio reporter Allie Clifton.

Through 50 episodes of Road Trippin’, Jefferson, Frye, and Clifton brought Cavaliers fans closer to an NBA locker room than anything we’ve ever seen before, with everything from in-depth basketball conversations to impromptu guest appearances by random Cavaliers employees. It was equal parts unique and terrific.




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East Ventures closes new $30M fund to continue investing in Indonesia

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East Ventures is back at it again with another new fund to invest in early-stage companies in Indonesia, Southeast Asia’s largest economy and the world’s fourth most populous country.

This new $30 million fund is the firm’s sixth to date in Southeast Asia, and remarkably its second in 2017 alone. A $27.5 million fund announced in January was fully deployed in less than a year as outside interest in Southeast Asia blew up in 2017, with Indonesia the focal point for investors like Chinese web giants Alibaba and Tencent.

East Ventures is one of the region’s longest-serving seed investors, having been active since 2010, and it is one of the few to have actually returned funds — the ultimate factor that defines success in VC land.

The data is certainly impressive.

East Ventures says 70 percent of Series A-funded startups in Indonesia bagged seed funding from the firm, while 83 percent of its 116 portfolio companies remain in business today.

Then there are some big gets. The firm has equity in four of the five unicorns in Southeast Asia:

  • Traveloka, which raised $350 million from Expedia
  • Tokopedia, which raised $1.1 billion led by Alibaba
  • Grab, which acquired East Ventures portfolio company Kudo in January
  • Go-Jek, which acquired East Ventures portfolio company Loket in August

The plan is very much to continue with the investment focus on Indonesia, although the firm said it may entertain deals in other countries in Southeast Asia further down the line.

“From day one, Indonesia is the story we believed in,” managing partner Willson Cuaca — who started the firm in Indonesia with  the former CTO of Japanese social network Mixi, Batara Eto — told TechCrunch in an interview.

“At this moment the GDP of Indonesia is nearly $1 trillion. Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines combined is still smaller, so it’s clear this is a huge economy.

“From the internet side, when we entered Indonesia in 2010, the online population was around 22 million. Right now, it’s around 90-100 million. Which other country in the world has that kind of growth? No country will have a delta of 80 million,” he added.

Already, the fund’s first investment has been announced: financial inclusion platform Telcoin, which uses digital tokens to help bank the unbanked in Indonesia and other emerging markets.

Featured Image: Everyone Sinks Starco/Flickr UNDER A CC BY-SA 2.0 LICENSE (IMAGE HAS BEEN MODIFIED)

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Why do stars continue to share nude pics despite hacks?

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Tiger Woods, Lindsey Vonn, Katharine McPhee and Kristen Stewart are among the latest celebrity victims of a private photo leak.

They are far from the first stars to have their racy pictures hacked. Everyone from Jennifer Lawrence to Scarlett Johansson to Emma Watson has had private photos stolen and published for the world to see: So why do A-listers continue to take nude pics knowing they could be leaked?

Clinical psychologist Dr. Chloe Carmichael speculated that stars play with fire due to “an unconscious conflict between a wish for privacy and a love of the spotlight.”

Carmichael suggested some stars may want the attention of having their photos leak online.

“It is possible that there is a part of the celebrity that enjoys the attention, and taking legal action actually intensifies the spotlight upon the event,” she said.

But Kevin Blatt, celebrity crisis expert with the VIP cyber security company Faction.One, said there’s more to it than fame.

“I believe a lot of these celebs are complete narcissists. They love to see themselves naked or in a sexy, compromising position. They love to show themselves off,” said Blatt.

While Scott Pinsker, publicity and branding expert, speculated that many stars may just think hacks can’t happen to them. 

“Celebrities have made careers out of defying the odds. They’ve achieved enormous success in highly-competitive industries… They don’t think they’ll get hacked because they’ve proven the naysayers wrong every step of the way,” Pinsker speculated. “The rules don’t ever seem to apply to them.”

Still, if stars must take compromising pics, co-founder of the cyber security firm RISKGEN Chris Jones said there are smarter ways to go about it. 

“If something can be seen it can be copied and that’s the biggest risk of transmitting a sensitive image,” he explained. “If you do need to send an intimate picture, I would use an ephemeral app like Snapchat, where you can control how long the image remains in the system before it is purged.” 

Fox News.com Reporter and FOX411 host Diana Falzone covers celebrity news and interviews some of today’s top celebrities and newsmakers.  You can follow her on Twitter @dianafalzone.

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How does Celeb Jihad continue to share hacked celebrity nude pics?

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Tiger Woods and Lindsey Vonn are the most recent victims of a private photo leak to threaten legal action. However countless celebrities have fallen victim to their most private moments being made public and lately one website seems to be doing a lot of the sharing: Celeb Jihad.

“Websites like Celebjihad.com try to skirt the laws of the U.S. by being hosted offshore,” explained Kevin Blatt, celebrity crisis expert with the VIP cyber security company Faction.One. “By being located offshore, some sites think they don’t need to adhere to the laws of many countries or that it’s simply another layer of protection against the lawyers that represent these A -list clients.”

Yet Carrie Goldberg, Internet and sexual privacy lawyer at C. A. Goldberg, PLLC, said once a website is caught breaking the law, legal action can be taken.

“Now that we have revenge porn laws in two out of three of states, no legitimate company would want to take the risk of exhibiting naked pictures of nonconsenting people,” she noted.

She said Celeb Jihad’s creators have attempted to hide their identities, but there is technology available to bring them into the light.

“The operators of Celeb Jihad have attempted to skirt legal liability by masking their identity,” Goldberg said. “One way to find out who runs a website is to look up the ICANN registration, which is public. CelebJihad.com hired a proxy service to register their domain. We often have cases like this and it’s one of my true pleasures in life to unmask the identities of web sites and then sue the crap out of them.”

A search of Who.Is.com, a website that lists where domains are registered, shows Celeb Jihad is tied to GoDaddy.com – an Arizona based company. Experts say the company may not be located overseas after all.

Dr. Charlotte Laws, a revenge porn advocate, told us, “If the information online about the Celeb Jihad website is accurate, the owner resides in Florida and he would therefore be in violation of the recent Florida law against revenge porn. If there is hacking associated with his website — as has been alleged — then he could also be in violation of federal law. He is also likely violating copyright law and hence the flurry of lawsuits from celebrities.”

However, Phoenix-based Internet lawyer David Gingras believes tracking down the real owner of a website is often difficult, time-consuming and not always effective in the long-term.

“If someone wanted to sue Celeb Jihad.com, they would need to send a subpoena to GoDaddy asking for the real name of the website’s owner. It’s very likely that the owner gave false information to GoDaddy such as a fake name or a non-existent address,” Gingras speculated.

Gingras said even if Celeb Jihad is shut down, a similar site could easily emerge.

“…The sad reality is that even if you shut down one website like this, the owner can move the content to a new website the next day, and the whole process may start over,” he said.

Celeb Jihad and GoDaddy did not return Fox News’ requests for comment.

Fox News.com Reporter and FOX411 host Diana Falzone covers celebrity news and interviews some of today’s top celebrities and newsmakers.  You can follow her on Twitter @dianafalzone.

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Why do stars continue to share nude pics despite hacks?

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Tiger Woods, Lindsey Vonn, Katharine McPhee and Kristen Stewart are among the latest celebrity victims of a private photo leak.

They are far from the first stars to have their racy pictures hacked. Everyone from Jennifer Lawrence to Scarlett Johansson to Emma Watson has had private photos stolen and published for the world to see: So why do A-listers continue to take nude pics knowing they could be leaked?

Clinical psychologist Dr. Chloe Carmichael speculated that stars play with fire due to “an unconscious conflict between a wish for privacy and a love of the spotlight.”

Carmichael suggested some stars may want the attention of having their photos leak online.

“It is possible that there is a part of the celebrity that enjoys the attention, and taking legal action actually intensifies the spotlight upon the event,” she said.

But Kevin Blatt, celebrity crisis expert with the VIP cyber security company Faction.One, said there’s more to it than fame.

“I believe a lot of these celebs are complete narcissists. They love to see themselves naked or in a sexy, compromising position. They love to show themselves off,” said Blatt.

While Scott Pinsker, publicity and branding expert, speculated that many stars may just think hacks can’t happen to them. 

“Celebrities have made careers out of defying the odds. They’ve achieved enormous success in highly-competitive industries… They don’t think they’ll get hacked because they’ve proven the naysayers wrong every step of the way,” Pinsker speculated. “The rules don’t ever seem to apply to them.”

Still, if stars must take compromising pics, co-founder of the cyber security firm RISKGEN Chris Jones said there are smarter ways to go about it. 

“If something can be seen it can be copied and that’s the biggest risk of transmitting a sensitive image,” he explained. “If you do need to send an intimate picture, I would use an ephemeral app like Snapchat, where you can control how long the image remains in the system before it is purged.” 

Fox News.com Reporter and FOX411 host Diana Falzone covers celebrity news and interviews some of today’s top celebrities and newsmakers.  You can follow her on Twitter @dianafalzone.

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Spotify launches in Thailand to continue its Asia push

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While talk of Spotify’s apparent upcoming IPO continues in the U.S., the music streaming service is furthering its coverage of Asia after it launched its service in Thailand.

Spotify Premium, which counts over 60 million paying users, will cost 129 THB in Thailand. That’s just over $4 and in line with its pricing across Asia. Customers in the U.S. and UK will be aware that it is substantially cheaper than what they pay, but Spotify has opted for local pricing worldwide.

Interestingly, Spotify will introduce daily and weekly packages to boost its potential in Thailand, where revenue from online music has actually declined by over 20 percent since 2012, Spotify Asia head Sunita Kaur told media at a press conference

The launch — which we reported was on the cards back in May — takes Spotify to 61 markets worldwide, and it is emblematic of the company’s recent focus on expanding its business in Asia.

Spotify first entered the region in 2013 with launches in Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia, it only added one new market over the next two years. It restarted its expansion plan in Asia last year when it launched its service in Indonesia, Southeast Asia’s largest economy and the world’s fourth largest population, and Japan, which is the world’s second most lucrative music market. Today’s launch takes it to seven countries in Asia, not including Australia and New Zealand when looking at the wider Asia Pacific area.

As we reported back in May, Vietnam is the next country in its sights, as evidenced by job listings and sources. India is a market that we understand Spotify has looked at seriously, but for now it has not committed to a launch.

Getting a solid position across Asia will help Spotify when it does finally go public. The latest reports suggest that will be via a direct listing, an unorthodox approach that involves going public without an IPO. Spotify is potentially missing out on hundreds of millions in proceeds from the IPO, but it could do a secondary offering to raise cash at a later date.

It’s also under pressure to compete with Apple Music, which is available worldwide. Spotify had an early head-start and it added 20 million paid subscribers in less than a year. It’s taken Apple Music more than a year and a half to make that progress. Spotify now has 60 million subscribers, compared to Apple Music’s 27 million, as of June.

Featured Image: Thomas Trutschel/Photothek/Getty Images

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Polanski sex-assault case will continue, judge rules

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A judge in Los Angeles has refused to end a four-decade-old sexual assault case against director Roman Polanski despite the victim’s plea.

Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Scott Gordon ruled that the fugitive director, who has been avoiding U.S. authorities in Europe since 1978, must return to California to resolve the 1977 case, in which Polanski was convicted of sexually abusing a 13-year-old girl.

The director served 42 days in prison.

The ruling comes after a request from Samantha Geimer, who urged the judge to end a “40-year sentence” on both her and the perpetrator. She blamed the director for refusing to resolve the case.

“Samantha Geimer is tired of this. She has been asking the court to terminate this case for years. She wants to get it over with,” Polanski’s attorney, Harland Braun, told Reuters in June when the request was first made.

He added Geimer will argue that the director has already served his time and shouldn’t be punished again.

Last Friday, however, the judge ruled against the plea to end the case, claiming Geimer’s statement was “dramatic evidence of the long-lasting and traumatic effect these crimes, and the defendant’s refusal to obey court orders and appear for sentencing, is having on her life.”

Polanski served time in prison after a plea bargain but later left the United States, fearing a longer sentence in the event the agreement was overruled.

In March, Braun tried to convince the court to allow Polanski to travel freely across the world without the fear of extradition to the U.S., and to return to the U.S. to visit the grave of his wife, Sharon Tate, Reuters reported.

L.A. district attorney Jackie Lacey slammed Polanski’s requests at the time, according to Reuters, saying: “The defendant is, once again, trying to dictate the terms of his return without risk to himself … [He] wants answers – but will only show up if he likes the answers.”

“There will be no discussion regarding what will happen until Mr. Polanski returns,” Lacey added.

The judge ruled against Polanski’s requests, claiming the director cannot cut deals with U.S. courts to return to the country while abroad and without serving more jail time, Reuters reported.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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new 50 rupee note: New Rs 50 note to hit market soon, old note to continue

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NEW DELHI: A new fluorescent blue Rs 50 banknote in the Mahatma Gandhi series, slightly smaller and slimmer than the existing note will soon be introduced by the Reserve Bank of India.

All earlier notes will also continue to be legal tender. The dimensions of the new note will be 66mm x 135mm. While the height is the same as the new Rs 500 and Rs 2,000 banknotes which were issued after demonetization, the width is lesser than the Rs 500 banknote.

Besides the colour and the dimensions, a unique feature of the new banknote is the motif of Hampi with the chariot and the Swachh Bharat logo with the slogan on the reverse.

The RBI on Friday disclosed the new-look Rs 50 note and provided details of the new security highlights. The announcement came after images of the new note started doing the rounds on social media. The central bank, however, remained mum on the Rs 200 note, which has also been
cleared according to sources+
.


Read this story in Gujarati

Security features for the new banknotes include micro letters ‘RBI’, ‘Bharat’ (in Devnagri), ‘INDIA’ and ’50’.

The banknote will also have a windowed demetalised security thread with inscriptions ‘Bharat’ (in Devnagri) and ‘RBI’.

The existence of two types of banknotes of the same denomination will make it complicated to dispense them from ATMs. However, this will not be a major issue as most banks have stopped dispensing Rs 50 notes in ATMs according to Navroze Dastur, CEO, NCR India. “If the Rs 50 note has to be dispensed from ATMs there will have to be separate cassettes for new and old notes,” said Dastur.

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Apple and Hollywood said to continue talks around early digital movie rentals

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Movie studios including Warner Bros. and Universal Pictures continue to hold talks with Apple and Comcast about plans to introduce premium digital rentals for new movies only a few weeks after their theatrical debut, Bloomberg reports. The talks continue even though powerful players in the mix aren’t on board – theater chain operators, who still have a lot of sway over Hollywood, aren’t happy with the idea, per the new report.

The plan to build an early rental offering whereby consumer could pay between $30 and $50 per movie to get access to current releases as few as two weeks after they premiere in theaters has been covered before: Back in late December, Bloomberg described the plan, noting that it’s part of the studios’ effort to shore up declines and stagnation in the home video and DVD sales market.

What’s changed is that negotiations between those in favor of the plan, including the studios and Apple, and those opposed, mostly the big theater chain operators, have reached an impasse. Potential plans included sharing some revenue from the new types of rentals with theaters, but to make that work, theater companies wanted a deal with a 10-year commitment, which Bloomberg says was more than the studios were able to stomach.

Even so, those who want this to happen could agree to a deal as soon as next year to distribute the digital films via Apple and Comcast, along with others, with only a two-week exclusivity window for theaters. That could have some fallout, of course, as chains could opt not to carry movies from studios who go with this kind of arrangement.

Other movie studios, including Disney, aren’t on board with this plan, since Bloomberg reports its focus with cinematic releases will be on stuff that’s best suited for big screen viewing. Others are more publicly already on board with the idea, including Lionsgate CEO Jon Feltheimer, who said it’s likely to come to platforms sometime in the next year, and that he “hopes” it will indeed happen as it should be “great for the business.”

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Alipay partners with Yelp to continue its pursuit of Chinese tourist money

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Ant Financial, the Alibaba affiliated valued at $60 billion, is continuing to follow Chinese tourists and their wallets overseas after it inked a deal with Yelp in the U.S..

The partnership allows Alipay users — and there are over 500 million registered in China — to make payment through the service when they use Yelp for restaurant bookings. The launch initially covers restaurants in New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and San Francisco, but there are plans to expand more widely across the country.

There are also plans to launch a version of the app that is translated into Mandarin Chinese to help travelers.

This tie-in follows a major expansion from Alipay in the U.S. in May. The Chinese firm teamed up with First Data in a move that brings support for its mobile payment system to point-of-sales systems of more than four million retail partners in the U.S.. That’s a peg that this Yelp deal is hanging on, since the integration will only work for Yelp restaurant partners that accept Alipay.

Alipay also massively increased its potential with global retailers looking to reach Chinese consumers online when Stripe added support for its service earlier this summer. Stripe also added rival WeChat Pay from Tencent to its roster.

Together Alipay and WeChat Pay control over 90 percent of the mobile payment market in China. Increasingly they are casting their nets overseas to follow Chinese tourist spending which is predicted to grow significantly.

A recent report co-authored by Visa estimates that Chinese travelers’ overseas spending came in at $137 billion in 2015. That figure is forecast to increase by 87 percent over the next decade, taking China’s spending to double that of the U.S., and more than the UK, Russia and Germany combined.

Featured Image: John Artman

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