‘Road Trippin’ Will Continue, With Or Without Richard Jefferson

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‘Road Trippin’ Will Continue, With Or Without Richard Jefferson

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The Richard Jefferson era in Cleveland has come and gone after the Cavaliers traded Jefferson to the Atlanta Hawks on Friday. Ultimately, the Cavaliers needed a roster spot for Dwyane Wade, and unfortunately, Jefferson was the odd man out.

The on-court impact of Jefferson leaving the Cavaliers deserves its own discussion at some point, but at 37-years old, it’s conceivable that the off-court impact Jefferson had on the team was a lot more important. Jefferson’s excellent presence in the Cavs locker room culminated in the creation of the Road Trippin’ podcast featuring Jefferson, teammate Channing Frye, and Fox Sports Ohio reporter Allie Clifton.

Through 50 episodes of Road Trippin’, Jefferson, Frye, and Clifton brought Cavaliers fans closer to an NBA locker room than anything we’ve ever seen before, with everything from in-depth basketball conversations to impromptu guest appearances by random Cavaliers employees. It was equal parts unique and terrific.




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‘Six Million Dollar Man’ Star Richard Anderson Dead at 91

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‘Six Million Dollar Man’ Star

Richard Anderson

Dead at 91

8/31/2017 4:40 PM PDT

Richard Anderson — who played the government agent who cooked up the idea for “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” in the 1970s — has died. 

Anderson passed away Thursday at his Beverly Hills home, according to his publicist. He famously portrayed OSI honcho Oscar Goldman on both TV shows. It’s his voice you hear in the show open talking about making Steve Austin “the world’s first bionic man.”

He had nearly 200 roles during his six-decade career … starring in movies as well as huge TV shows in the ’60s and ’70s, including “Bonanza,” “Hawaii Five-O” and “The Mod Squad.”

Richard was 91. 

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‘The Six Million Dollar Man’ actor Richard Anderson dies at 91

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Richard Anderson, the tall, handsome actor best known for costarring simultaneously in the popular 1970s television shows “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman,” has died at age 91.

Anderson died of natural causes on Thursday, family spokesman Jonathan Taylor told The Associated Press.

“The Six Million Dollar Man” brought a new wave of supernatural heroes to television. Based on the novel “Cyborg” by Martin Caidin, it starred Lee Majors as U.S. astronaut Steve Austin, who is severely injured in a crash. The government saves his life by rebuilding his body with atom-powered artificial limbs and other parts, giving him superhuman strength, speed and other powers.

Anderson played Oscar Goldman, Majors’ boss at the secret government spy agency the astronaut went to work for after becoming a cyborg.

“Richard became a dear and loyal friend, and I have never met a man like him,” Majors said in a statement Thursday, adding the two first met when they filmed several episodes of another hit television show, the 1960s western “The Big Valley.”

“I called him ‘Old Money.’ His always stylish attire, his class, calmness and knowledge never faltered in his 91 years,” Majors said, adding Anderson was “still the sweet charming man” when they spoke just a few weeks ago.

“The Six Million Dollar Man” began as a TV movie in 1973 and when it proved a hit it was turned into a weekly series the following year. Its popularity led to the 1976 spinoff show, “The Bionic Woman,” starring Lindsay Wagner.

Anderson took on the Oscar Goldman role in that show, too, sometimes appearing from week to week in both series.

“I can’t begin to say how much I have always admired and have been grateful for the elegance and loving friendship I was blessed to have with Richard Anderson,” Wagner said in a statement.

In “The Bionic Woman,” Wagner was a tennis pro whose body was rebuilt after a near-fatal skydiving accident. After obtaining powers similar to those of “The Six Million Dollar Man,” she went to work for the same government agency run by Anderson’s character.

In real life, Majors recalled, it was Anderson who embraced tennis, traveling the world to play in tournaments.

“He loved his daughters, tennis and his work as an actor,” he said.

Anderson, who stood 6-feet-4, began his career in 1949 with a small role as a wounded soldier in “12 O’Clock High.” Soon after, his comedy scenes in a TV series called “Lights, Camera, Action!” drew the attention of MGM, which offered him a screen test and a contract.

He had decided to try acting after watching Gary Cooper movies, and at the screen test he performed a scene from Cooper’s “The Cowboy and the Lady.”

At MGM he played secondary roles in such movies as “The Magnificent Yankee,” ”Across the Wide Missouri,” ”Scaramouche,” ”The Story of Three Loves,” ”The Student Prince,” ”Hit the Deck” and “Forbidden Planet.”

“When people ask me where I received my education, I tell them it was at MGM U,” the Internet Movie Database quoted him as saying. “The biggest lessons that I learned is that acting is a talent. You can’t teach it. And even if you have the talent, you have to get the part.”

When MGM began thinning out its contract list in the late 1950s, Anderson was let go.

He went on to make movies for other studios, appearing in such films as Stanley Kubrick’s “Paths of Glory,” ”The Long Hot Summer,” ”Compulsion,’ “The Wackiest Ship in the Navy,” ”The Gathering of Eagles,” ”Johnny Cool,” ”Seven Days in May” and “Kitten With a Whip.”

Anderson was also a frequent guest on TV series and had regular roles on “Bus Stop,” ”Perry Mason,” ”Dan August” and “The Fugitive.”

Other television credits included “Slattery’s People,” ”Dr. Kildare,” ”The Virginian,” ”The Rifleman,” ”Bonanza,” ”Mannix” and “The Mod Squad.”

He also acted as producer when “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” were revived in later years as TV movies.

Richard Norman Anderson was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, on Aug. 8, 1928. He later moved to Los Angeles, where he began appearing in high school plays.

After two years in the Army, he began studying at the Actors Laboratory in Los Angeles. Soon he was landing work in radio and summer stock productions.

Anderson was married and divorced twice. His first wife, Carol Lee Ladd, was the daughter of actor Alan Ladd.

His second wife, Katharine Thalberg, was the daughter of actress Norma Shearer and movie mogul Irvin Thalberg. The couple had three daughters,

His daughters, Ashley Anderson, Brooke Anderson and Deva Anderson survive him.

The family says memorial services will be private.

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Richard Simmons Big Lawsuit Loss, Calling Someone Transgender Isn’t Defamatory

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Richard Simmons

Big Loss in Lawsuit

Calling Someone Transgender Isn’t Defamatory

8/30/2017 11:54 AM PDT

Breaking News

Richard Simmons just suffered a potentially devastating loss in his lawsuit against American Media — which claimed he was transitioning to a woman — because the judge just said calling someone transgender is NOT defamatory.

The National Enquirer published a story saying Simmons had undergone hormone treatment and was in the process of sexual reassignment. Richard says it’s a lie and sued for defamation.

The judge just said being misidentified as transgender does not inherently expose someone to “hatred, contempt or ridicule… .”

The judge went on to say, “While, as a practical matter, the characteristic may be held in contempt by a portion of the population, the court will not validate those prejudices by legally recognizing them.”

The judge’s ruling is “tentative,” but in almost all cases this is the way the lawsuit will go. If calling Richard transgender is not defamatory, the lawsuit is on the shakiest of grounds.

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Richard Simmons lawsuit in trouble after judge claims being called transgender is not defamation

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Richard Simmons’ lawsuit against the National Enquirer hit an unexpected snag in court. A judge seems to be ready to rule in favor of the gossip outlet for a surprising reason.

Simmons sued both the Enquirer and Radar Online in May for a series of articles that alleged the 69-year-old fitness guru was transitioning to become a woman. He alleged that, while he holds no personal ill-feelings toward the transgender community, the articles were false and defamatory to his character. According to The Hollywood Reporter, his lawyers argued that, as a public figure, he has a legal right to “not be portrayed as someone he is not.” However, a judge is tentatively ruling that alleging someone is transgender is not necessarily defamatory.

Although the outlet notes that no official ruling has been made, the court is making it clear that it plans to treat the issue of claiming someone is transgender the same way it would treat claims of race, illness or other “immutable characteristics.”

“This court finds that because courts have long held that a misidentification of certain immutable characteristics do not naturally tend to injure one’s reputation, even if there is a sizeable portion of the population who hold prejudices against those characteristics, misidentification of a person as transgender is not actionable defamation absent special damages,” L.A. Superior Court judge Gregory Keosian said.

He went on to explain that, while being transgender may subject a person to ridicule or prejudice from a large portion of the population, “the court will not validate those prejudices by legally recognizing them.”

However, according to Variety, Simmons’ lawyers are trying to make the case that the court has a responsibility to legally recognize those prejudices rather than plan ahead for an ideal world in which they do not exist.

“The object of the National Enquirer was to do everything they could to humiliate this person,” said attorney Neville Johnson, who represents Simmons. “They made it up entirely out of whole cloth. I submit that when you make something up intentionally… and put it on the cover, there’s an inference you can make that somebody’s reputation is going to be harmed.”

Keosian is thinking on the matter and is expected to give a written ruling soon.

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Richard Simmons To Appeal Ruling That Misidentifying Transgender People is NOT Defamation

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Richard Simmons to Appeal Ruling

That Transgender Misidentification

Is NOT Defamation

8/30/2017 1:08 PM PDT

EXCLUSIVE

Richard Simmons will appeal the devastating ruling on his transgender defamation lawsuit, TMZ has learned, and that could establish whether people are allowed to say someone’s gay or transgender without fear of lawsuit.

Simmons’ lawyer, Neville Johnson, tells TMZ, if the ruling becomes final he will absolutely challenge by filing an appeal. As we reported, Simmons filed a defamation lawsuit against American Media for a National Enquirer story claiming the fitness guru was transitioning to a woman … which he says is a lie.

The judge in the case just gave a tentative ruling, saying misidentifying someone as transgender does not inherently expose someone to “hatred, contempt or ridicule,” adding “the characteristic may be held in contempt by a portion of the population, [but] the court will not validate those prejudices by legally recognizing them.”

Johnson scoffs at the logic, telling TMZ, “Transgenders can’t joint the Air Force, they can’t go to the bathroom” … in other words, it’s ridiculous to say there is not significant scorn and ridicule in the U.S.

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Judge Dismisses Richard Simmons’ Transgender Defamation Suit

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Judge Dismisses Richard Simmons' Transgender Defamation

Erik Pendzich/REX/Shutterstock

In a strange victory for trans rights, an L.A. Superior Court judge indicated Wednesday that he would dismiss Richard Simmons’ defamation suit against the National Enquirer and Radar Online.

Simmons sued the publications in May over a story alleging that he was in the process of becoming a woman. While affirming his support for trans people, Simmons has vehemently rejected the claim.

But in his tentative ruling, Judge Gregory Keosian ruled that being misidentified as transgender does not inherently expose someone to “hatred, contempt, ridicule or obloquy,” and therefore does not rise to the level of defamation.

“While, as a practical matter, the characteristic may be held in contempt by a portion of the population, the court will not validate those prejudices by legally recognizing them,” Keosian ruled.

The ruling appears to be the first to address the question of whether being labeled as transgender is sufficiently harmful to one’s reputation to be libelous. Courts have long ruled that misidentifying someone’s race is not defamatory, and Keosian argued that the transgender classification should operate in the same way. He is set to issue a final ruling in the coming days.

At a hearing on Wednesday, Simmons’ attorneys argued that the court should confront the reality of the harms that transgender people face, rather than assume an ideal world where such harms do not exist.

“There are giant segments of society in this country who endorse the kind of prejudice and hatred and shunning of transgender persons in a way that is dramatically different than the way we treat race in this country,” argued attorney Rodney Smolla, on behalf of Simmons.

“The object of the National Enquirer was to do everything they could to humiliate this person,” added attorney Neville Johnson, also representing Simmons. “They made it up entirely out of whole cloth. I submit that when you make something up intentionally… and put it on the cover, there’s an inference you can make that somebody’s reputation is going to be harmed.”

Arguing for the defendants, attorney Kelli Sager called the suit “a case essentially in search of a legal theory.”

“It’s not something that is actionable,” Sager said. “There is nothing inherently bad about being transgender.”

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Richard King Lists Silver Lake Spanish Home

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Uber-accomplished motion picture sound designer Richard King has his stylishly eclectic four-bedroom and two-bathroom hillside home in L.A.’s boho-chic Silver Lake area up for sale at a smidgen less than $2 million. King, who’s frequently worked with powerhouse auteurs like Christopher Nolan, Paul Thomas Anderson and Steven Spielberg, is well positioned to realize a hefty profit on the not quite 2,900-square-foot vintage-1920s Spanish-style home, which tax records indicate was purchased in 1995 for $350,000.

A discreet entry and slender entrance hall with peg-and-groove hardwood flooring steps down to a living room with wood beams across the ceiling, a fireplace and glass doors to a slim balcony with canyon views that on a clear day extend all the way to the distant shimmer of the Pacific Ocean.

Arched display niches, where King shows off his trio of Oscars won for his work on “Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World,” “The Dark Knight” and “Inception,” flank a larger archway. This connects to a dining room that links through to a slightly petite, cottage-style kitchen appointed with name-brand stainless steel appliances and a mix of mahogany-and-soapstone countertops. A small office with built-in cabinetry, two bedrooms and a remodeled, period-style hall bathroom complete the upper level. The downstairs provides two more bedrooms, a colorfully tiled bathroom, a sunroom/yoga studio/gym and a family room.

Due to the steep downward slope of the hillside lot, the courtyard-size backyard sits well below the upper two levels of the house and incorporates a tree-shaded stone patio, a sandbox-size patch of fake grass, a sports court and a couple of concrete-floored basement rooms with exterior entrances.

listing photos: Compass

 

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‘Last Flag Flying’ Trailer: Richard Linklater’s New Movie — Watch

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Bryan Cranston and Steve Carell take Laurence Fishburne on an unexpected trip to New York City in the official trailer for Richard Linker’s new movie “Last Flag Flying.”

The trailer starts with Cranston and Carell together in a car. The two play old friends.

“You know what amazes me about you?” Carell asks.

“Could be anything I’m a pretty amazing guy,” Cranston responds.

“You turn the keys to your bar over to the guy who’s asleep on your pool table. And then you jump in your car and you drive me to hell and gone, and you don’t even know where we’re going,” Carell says.

The two travel to find Fishburne’s character who used to be a part of their crew, but is now a pastor. “I haven’t seen these men in decades,” Fishburne says. “They represent a dark period in my life.”

Their mission is a somber one — Carell’s son has died, and he wants his friends to accompany him to the funeral. But they end up on a road trip to New York.

In addition to directing, Linklater also co-wrote the script with Darryl Ponicsan, based on the latter’s novel. The story is conceived as a sequel to Hal Ashby’s 1972 classic “The Last Detail.”

“Last Flag Flying” will have its world premiere at the New York Film Festival on Sept. 28. It will then enter select theaters on Nov. 3. Watch the trailer below:

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Mike Epps Uncensored: Compares Kevin Hart to Kim Kardashian & Playing the Role of Richard Pryor



Hilarious-man Mike Epps, hung out with us today on Sway in the Morning and opened up to us about a lot! Talking to us about his new AOL series, That’s Racist, …

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