‘Road Trippin’ Will Continue, With Or Without Richard Jefferson

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‘Road Trippin’ Will Continue, With Or Without Richard Jefferson

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The Richard Jefferson era in Cleveland has come and gone after the Cavaliers traded Jefferson to the Atlanta Hawks on Friday. Ultimately, the Cavaliers needed a roster spot for Dwyane Wade, and unfortunately, Jefferson was the odd man out.

The on-court impact of Jefferson leaving the Cavaliers deserves its own discussion at some point, but at 37-years old, it’s conceivable that the off-court impact Jefferson had on the team was a lot more important. Jefferson’s excellent presence in the Cavs locker room culminated in the creation of the Road Trippin’ podcast featuring Jefferson, teammate Channing Frye, and Fox Sports Ohio reporter Allie Clifton.

Through 50 episodes of Road Trippin’, Jefferson, Frye, and Clifton brought Cavaliers fans closer to an NBA locker room than anything we’ve ever seen before, with everything from in-depth basketball conversations to impromptu guest appearances by random Cavaliers employees. It was equal parts unique and terrific.




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Uber driver stabbed in New York City road rage case, police say

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Police in New York City are searching for a suspect who reportedly stabbed an Uber driver during a fit of road rage Thursday afternoon.

The victim, who had an Uber sticker in the windshield of his gray SUV, got into an altercation with the suspect around 3:45 p.m. in Midtown Manhattan.

The NYPD says the attacker got out of his vehicle and stabbed the Uber driver in his left arm before driving off toward Sixth Avenue.

The victim appeared to be in stable condition on the scene.

The suspect drove a gray GMC Acadia with New York Taxi and Limousine Commission plates, police said.

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Is Land Rover planning a new ‘Road Rover’ line of luxury EVs?

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It looks like Land Rover might be putting together something new for the Chinese and North American markets. According to Autocar, the British automaker will release an electric vehicle sub-brand dubbed Road Rover before the end of the decade. Expecting the car to debut at the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show, Autocar thinks the future Land Rover Road Rover will compete directly with luxe-sedans like the Mercedes-Benz S-Class and the BMW 7-Series.

We don’t doubt Land Rover is looking at China and electrification, nor do we doubt the plausibility of an ultra-soft-roader in the form of a wagon or sedan, but that name: Road Rover? After reaching out to Land Rover, a spokesperson said the Road Rover story is speculation but did not deny a future product akin to what Autocar expects.

We also reached out to Nick Gibbs, a U.K.-based correspondent for Autoweek sister publication Automotive News, who had similar doubts about the name. Gibbs expects Land Rover to expand the Range Rover name because of its brand equity rather than starting another line for cars. Earlier this year, Gibbs spoke with Land Rover designer Gerry McGovern, who echoed those sentiments of equity. 


2017 Land Rover Range Rover SVAutobiography Dynamic Quick Take



McGovern said, “If you look at the Range Rover family of vehicles in the same way the Discovery range and the Defender that hasn’t come yet, there’s opportunities within all three families to expand into areas that we haven’t been in. I would argue that, at the moment, within our whole division, Range Rover has by far the most equity, in terms of premium pricing and in terms of sitting in that world of luxury.”

With the Chinese new-car market still hot on luxury sedans, we’re pretty sure Land Rover will build something to expand its name and further its awareness around the world. However, we doubt Land Rover will introduce a name like Road Rover instead of simply expanding the Range Rover lineup like the company has already done with the Evoque convertible and the new Velar. It looks like we’ll find out for sure what’s happening by the end of 2019.













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Land Rover Experience Center Heritage Program will let you drive Defenders off road

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If you didn’t try the Land Rover Defender back when it was on sale in the 1990s and now don’t wish to part with your two-bedroom home to afford that same 1990s Defender, you’re not completely out of luck. Land Rover has just launched a driving experience program at three sites in the U.S. that will let participants act out their fantasies of being a tweed-capped, Wellington-wearing farmer somewhere in Scotland who has a bunch of scuffed Defenders around the estate that he daily-drives with two Shelties.

The half-day and full-day Land Rover Experience Center Heritage Programs will be offered in Mount Equinox, Vermont; Asheville, North Carolina; and Carmel, California, and will allow participants to drive the Defender off-road alongside modern Land Rover and Range Rover vehicles. Participants will be able to more than just drive the Defender through some boggy puddles — they will take this legendary workhorse through mud, water crossings, ruts and grassland — the kind of terrain that a lot of Defenders sold in the U.S. have yet to see (because a lot of them are owned by wealthy urbanites who take them to Whole Foods). Participants in the program will get personal coaching from experienced Land Rover instructors at these specially prepared sites.

Having just taken a modern Td6 Discovery up and down the trails of Mount Equinox, we can tell you that these off-road courses are not kidding around, and that you won’t be able to tackle these trails with a cup of caramel macchiato in one hand. When the Land Rovers that we drove weren’t going through WWII bomb crater-sized ruts, balancing on three wheels, they were scrambling through the forest up some hairy trails, navigating around big boulders and downed trees.
 



Land Rover Defender

Land Rover will offer half-day and full-day programs at three U.S. sites.


Drive Review East Coast Defenders Land Rover Defenders 90 and 110East Coast Defenders



“Recognized as one of our most iconic vehicles, the Defender has conquered some of the world’s most demanding terrain and we are thrilled to be bringing that experience to consumers through the Land Rover Experience Center Heritage Program,” said Kim McCullough, vice president of marketing, Jaguar Land Rover North America. “Brand loyalists and new fans alike now have the opportunity to get behind the wheel of a piece of history and continue to celebrate this historic Land Rover icon.”

The programs kick off this month at all three sites; half a day’s worth of driving is priced at $1,200, and a full day follows closely at $1,500. It’s not cheap, but it’s a better idea than selling all of your family’s cars and your in-laws’ cars (while they’re on that cruise in the Mediterranean for two weeks) to afford a 1990s Defender. Start practicing a Midlands accent now to get into the spirit of it if you plan on joining Land Rover on this program, and bring a pair of Wellies.
 


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Get your Range in order with Land Rover Heritage

Land Rover plans to launch its Heritage division at the upcoming Techno Classica in Essen, Germany, April 15-19. The Heritage division will become part of the Special Operations outfit and will …






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Photography On Location: The Mojave Road



Nestled in the desert of Southern California you’ll find the Mojave Road – a 138-mile trail that cuts completely through the Mojave National Preserve. This trail …

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‘Lean on Pete’ Review: Runaway Boy and Stolen Horse Hit the Road

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In case you were wondering, Lean on Pete is the name of a horse. Not a special one, just your average American quarter horse — a doomed beast stuck racing for small-stakes bets at second-tier tracks in and around Portland, Oregon. Based on Willy Vlautin’s novel of the same name, “Lean on Pete” is the story of said horse and of the boy who saves him from the glue factory, or from being sent down to Mexico to be slaughtered. And, depending on how corny you want to get, how the kid saves himself in the process.

What “Lean on Pete” is not is a children’s movie, or a crowd-pleaser, or an uplifting coming-of-age story. Directed by Andrew Haigh, who previously told the relatively artful grown-up modern romances “Weekend” and “45 Years,” it’s a serious-minded, unvarnished glimpse into how it feels to be 15 and completely alone in the world. But instead of playing that situation for sympathy, Haigh takes the Bressonian high road, adopting an austere, arm’s-length style that keeps the audience at an uncomfortable distance from the character.

The film’s salvation comes in the casting of newcomer Charlie Plummer as teenage Charley Thompson — tall, still awkwardly adjusting to his new adolescent dimensions, with angular facial features and a brow that’s seen too much worrying for his 15 years. Charley’s mom walked out when he was young, and his dad is a beer-bellied slob (played by one-time Calvin Klein model Travis Fimmel, here looking more like the redneck version of his rugged “Vikings” character), not a bad guy, but no role model either, getting drunk after work and using what remains of his homecoming-king charm to bring home local women (it’s a part better suited to Steve Zahn, who appears later, miscast as an abusive, borderline-homeless man).

Charley has just moved to Portland when we meet him, and while jogging around the neighborhood, he’s captivated by the racetrack a few blocks from his new home. He’s never ridden a horse in his life, but curiosity draws him to the Portland Downs, where a surly and somewhat shady trainer named Del (introduced out of focus, but recognizable as Steve Buscemi by his nasal voice alone) offers him spending money to help manage his half dozen horses, of which Lean on Pete is one.

Charley accompanies Del to an out-of-town race, teaching him the ropes — though he can only go so far. “You don’t have any manners, do you?” Del asks Charley after watching the kid eat, all but inhaling his food. Somehow that moment says everything we need to know about his negligent upbringing, though Haigh weaves in other clues: Charley’s home is a sty, messier than the stables where the horses sleep, and the only fatherly advice his dad has to offer is, “All the best women have been waitresses at one point,” even if the movie bears out that observation.

Charley hits it off with Del’s battle-scarred sometime-jockey Bonnie (Chloë Sevigny), who tells him she once worked at Red Lobster. Bonnie’s kindness toward the kid is heartbreaking. In fact, the film’s most powerful moments occur when other characters show empathy toward the boy — most notably in a scene where he is caught trying to dine-and-dash, and his fate is decided by a waitress. Still, the only mother figure Charley wants is his estranged Aunt Martha (Rachael Perrell Fosket). Eventually, for reasons better left to audiences to discover, the kid will set out to find her on his own.

For an English director, Haigh has an impressive, instinctive feel for this lower-income American milieu, including well-observed details, such as the neighbor who hangs a patriotic flag from her porch, but fails to come when an emergency breaks out next door. And yet, childhood itself seems like a foreign country to him. Whether stealing Lean on Pete from his proper owners or attempting to dine-and-dash from a restaurant when he has no food, Charley’s actions are convincingly those of a 15-year-old boy — but they are lifted directly from Vlautin’s novel, with little indication that Haigh understands the psychology behind those impulses.

It’s as if Haigh has set out to synthesize two of Robert Bresson’s best-known classics, “Au Hasard Balthazar” (about the bond between a farm girl and her donkey) and “Mouchette” (in which a child from an unhappy home finds trouble when she runs away), attempting to channel a similarly understated tone. In so doing, he invites audiences to fill in those emotions his character never articulates outright — as in the scene that follows a violent outburst, as Charley stands in front of a bathroom mirror, quivering as he reacts to something new and disturbing in his own reflection. We can conclude that he feels something during this moment, but precisely what is anybody’s guess.

And then there’s the matter of Charley’s horse. Spoiler alert: Lean on Pete does not make it until the end of the movie. In fact, he dies a ghastly death — one that no person who goes to see a movie named after a horse will want to witness. To make matters worse, the moment is handled in an alarmingly detached way (the horse’s death puts other humans in danger, but Haigh ignores the others who might have been killed altogether).

Charley makes some very bad decisions over the course of the film, but is presumably redeemed by what a sensitive young man he is — except that when it counts most, he shows zero interest in his own species. While tragic, it’s a damningly false moment, delivered at a critical juncture, that belies the notion that Haigh’s distancing style is somehow humanist at its core. Whose heart doesn’t go out to an orphan outlaw with only a horse to call his friend? That much is easy. But Haigh’s approach is entirely counterintuitive, asking us to identify with the young man, even as the style throws obstacles in the way of such a connection. It’s frustrating to watch, but designed in such a way that the boy’s loneliness will haunt long afterward.

Venice Film Review: ‘Lean on Pete’

Reviewed at Rodeo screening room, Los Angeles, Aug. 28, 2017. Running time: 122 MIN.

Production

(U.K.) An A24 release of a Film4, BFI presentation of a The Bureau production. Producer: Tristan Goligher. Executive producers: Lizzie Francke, Ben Roberts, Daniel Battsek, Sam Lavendar, David Kosse, Vincent Gadelle, Darren Demetre.

Crew

Director, writer: Andrew Haigh, based on the novel by Willy Vlautin. Camera (color): Magnus Jønck. Editor: Jonathan Alberts. Music: James Edward Barker.

With

Charlie Plummer, Chloë Sevigny, Steve Zahn, Justin Rain, Lewis Pullman, Bob Olin, Teyah Hartley, Kurt Conroyd, Alison Elliott, Rachael Perrell Fosket, Jason Rouse, Travis Fimmel, Steve Buscemi.

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Charlotte Flair Says Ric ‘Has A Long Road’ In Her Return To Smackdown

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Charlotte Flair returned to Smackdown on Tuesday night and gave another positive update about her legendary father, Ric Flair. The Nature Boy’s daughter gave an interview backstage at the WWE Smackdown taping in North Little Rock, Ark., saying her father will have “a long road” but seemed optimistic about his recovery.

Flair has been in the hospital for about two weeks now dealing with multiple organ problems, but Flair’s return to the WWE stable indicates his situation is improving. Flair’s fiancee gave a more positive update earlier in the week, saying that she “witnessed a miracle” in his improving health. Charlotte wasn’t nearly as dramatic, but said the family is getting better after a difficult stretch.

“It’s probably the hardest two weeks I’ve had,” Charlotte said. But man, my dad’s a fighter.”

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Nissan’s Rogue Hybrid hits the road

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Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow

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Meet the drop-resistant Moto Z2 Force

The Moto Z2 Force is really thin, with a fast processor and great battery life. It can survive drops without shattering.

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