In Eric Ries’ new book, he tells companies to turn every unit into a cash-strapped ‘startup’

[ad_1]


All companies are startups until they aren’t. Many struggle to find their way back, too. It’s not the days of constrained resources or terrible pay or the heart-stopping uncertainty that they’re missing, of course. Instead, the problem is that it’s a lot harder to implement change at an “established” organization, particularly one that’s making money. Yet the smartest companies know change is crucial. As journalist Alan Deutschman wrote a dozen years ago, including in a book of the same title: “Change or die.”

Because that’s easier said than done, CEOs are always seeking out new ideas. Enter the brand-new book of engineer and entrepreneur Eric Ries, whose last tome, The Lean Startup, became an instant best-seller when it was first published in 2011.

In his latest effort, The Startup Way, Ries says the way to stay on top can be traced to two things: treating employees like customers, and treating business units like startups — replete with their own constrained budgets, and even their own boards. Ries offers fairly concrete suggestions regarding how to implement both, too. “A lot of people write manifestos and basically say, ‘Do what I say,’” says Ries. “I try to get away from that. The details matter a lot.”

We caught up with Ries earlier today to learn more about the book, which will be available to buy beginning Tuesday.

TC: You established a name for yourself with The Lean Startup, which basically told founders to get a minimally viable product into the market, then fix it. Can founders still do that in an age where big companies are getting bigger and moving faster to either copy products, or else acquire their teams?

ER:  People said that years ago about Microsoft, too, that it was going to dominate the internet with its monopoly power. Disruption still brings new power players to the fore. But today, because Facebook and Amazon and Google are so good at what they do, startups do need to up their game. There was a time when you had one innovation that you could ride for decades. That’s over. Continuous reinvention is crucial now. Otherwise, you’re toast.

TC: What about the giant financing rounds of today, even at the seed stage — do they signal the death of the so-called lean startup? 

ER: “Lean” never referred to the size of a round. It’s about lean manufacturing and using resources more effectively. Also, huge rounds are really for the privileged few. I’m in Columbus right now, and [local startups] aren’t experiencing the jumbo seed round.

I will say that one commonality that Silicon Valley has with corporate innovation is that we often overfund things, which can be just as lethal as underfunding them.

TC: How did you move from advocating for lean startups to writing this new book? 

ER: When a lot of small early founders heard about the lean startup, they were excited about minimal viable products and about pivoting and learning, but they didn’t pay close attention to more boring parts like management and the need to do continuous innovation. In some cases, as these companies passed 100 employees, or even 1,000, they’d ask me to come help teach lean startups to people who work for them. You go from the person who is making innovation decisions, to supporting entrepreneurs who work for you, and they might not be as good as you or you’d be working for them.

These were my friends and I was happy to help them. At the same time, big companies were asking how they could recapture their innovative DNA and I realized how similar these issues are and thought it was worth exploring.

TC: Obviously, the need to innovate continuously isn’t a new concept. How is your advice to companies different? Is this about pulling in opinions and ideas from a more diverse group of people, either internally or externally?

ER: I’m a big believer in that thesis — diversity. But in this book, I tend to focus on structural changes: who gets promoted, how we make product decisions, the general accountability layer of a company. [In other words] how do you figure out who is doing a good job and who isn’t? Because there’s a lot of B.S. at the higher levels otherwise that distorts the decisions that are made and consequently makes it hard to attract top talent.

TC: Give us some concrete examples. Who in Silicon Valley was doing this wrong and figured it out?

ER: I talk in the book about Twilio and Dropbox and Airbnb; they all had to go through a metamorphosis to empower their internal innovators.

Dropbox, for example, had some failures and was willing to admit that some products didn’t work. Some of its product development was happening internally and some externally, but it doesn’t matter if you plant in the wrong soil. But it has since developed a much better process that looks closer to entrepreneurship.

TC: By doing what differently?

ER: You first have to look at whether you’re treating the people who work for you like entrepreneurs or something different; if you’re expecting your product managers to achieve instantaneous success, that’s not [the standard] to which you were held in the early stages of your company.

Along the same lines, if you aren’t [giving teams] clear, metered funding, how are they going to have that scarcity? It’s that mindset, that hunger, that let’s you say “no,” [to delaying product launches]. [Companies have to fight] that entitlement funding because the more money you have, the less you want to expose yourself to risk.

TC: Interesting idea. How else do you recommend that companies treat their teams like startups?

ER: We also talk about creating a growth board.

Right now, most corporate employees exist in a matrix management structure, reporting to different people and having lots of different managers who have veto power over what they do. But each time a middle manager checks in, he or she exerts a gravitation influence, and most product mangers who I meet with say they spend 50 percent of their time defending their existing budget against middle manager inquiries. That’s a massive tax on most product teams.

So we treat [these units] like a startup and create a board of [say] five execs who they report to infrequently. That way, if any middle manager has a concern, [the head of that unit] can say, “Talk to the board.”  It’s like at [ venture firm] Andreessen Horowitz. It has something like 150 employees [yet] not every person who works there gets to call a portfolio company founder. Not every limited partner who has invested in Andreessen Horowitz gets to call its founders. There are well-defined processes in place so that founders [aren’t fielding calls all day.]

TC: Of course, the downside to that is that VCs often don’t know when things go off the rails at startups. How do you convince executives that they aren’t running that risk by giving these teams so much autonomy?

ER: It only works if you do limited liability experiments. Often asking, “What’s the worst that could happen?” is like a death sentence, but you have to think through the possible downsides to mitigate them. So you only let 100 people buy the product [at the outset] and add in extra provisions and securities to ensure they have a great experience and you’re smart about the liabilities.

TC: Say that works. What happens to the already oft-maligned middle managers of the world? 

ER: There haven’t been any layoffs at the companies I’ve worked with. Companies still have to run their core business; there’s plenty for [middle managers to do] Most are horrifically overworked. Others become reborn as entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial coaches. Intuit and GE have a whole program for coaching and mentoring, and that becomes part of [managers’] job description.

This all culminates in preparing a new org chart, one that treats entrepreneurship like a corporate function that’s owned and managed. Right now, if you ask [many executives], “Who is in charge of the next big innovation,” they’ll sometimes say that everyone is in charge of it. Can you imagine if they said that everyone is in charge of marketing or finance or HR? Entrepreneurship is no different. Someone should have operational responsibility for it.

TC: Do you run into much resistance when you talk with CEOs about empowering employees in this way? It’s easy to imagine that some feel threatened, even as they know their companies need to keep innovating.

ER: What distinguishes really good CEOs is that they care about their legacy, and they’re committed to the long-term health of their organization.

But you’re right. Most CEO are not serious about change because it requires senior managers to change their behavior. You know how corporate bosses can be. This is not always a very welcome method. I’ve been kicked out of plenty of boardrooms.

[ad_2]

Source link

Georgia Cop Tells White Woman … Don’t Worry, We Only Kill Black People

[ad_1]

GA Cop to White Woman

‘Remember, We Only Kill Black People’

8/31/2017 7:38 AM PDT

A Cobb County police officer reassured a white woman who was afraid she’d be shot when he pulled her over by telling her … “Remember, we only kill black people.”

During dashcam video of the incident, the woman told the officer she didn’t want to reach for her mobile phone in her lap because she’d seen too many videos of cops shooting motorists. The cop, Lt. Greg Abbott, quickly responded, “But you’re not black. We only kill black people, right?”

The interaction starts at 30 secs. into the video.

Lt. Abbott has been placed on administrative duties, and an internal investigation has been launched.

His attorney says, “He was attempting to de-escalate a situation involving an uncooperative passenger. In context, his comments were clearly aimed at attempting to gain compliance by using the passenger’s own statements and reasoning to avoid making an arrest.”

WSB first obtained the video.

[ad_2]

Source link

Washington tells Russia to close consulate, buildings in U.S.

[ad_1]

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States has told Russia to close its consulate in San Francisco and two annex buildings in Washington and New York, the State Department said on Thursday, a response to Moscow last month ordering cuts in the U.S. diplomatic mission in Russia.

The announcement was the latest in tit-for-tat measures between the two countries that have helped to drive relations to a new post-Cold War low, thwarting hopes on both sides that they might improve after U.S. President Donald Trump took office in January.

Last month Moscow ordered the United States to cut its diplomatic and technical staff in Russia by more than half, to 455 people, after Congress overwhelmingly approved new sanctions against Russia. The sanctions were imposed in response to Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and to punish Russia further for its 2014 annexation of Crimea from Ukraine.

“We believe this action was unwarranted and detrimental to the overall relationship between our countries,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a statement on Thursday.

“In the spirit of parity invoked by the Russians, we are requiring the Russian Government to close its Consulate General in San Francisco, a chancery annex in Washington, D.C., and a consular annex in New York City,” Nauert said. “These closures will need to be accomplished by September 2.”

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov expressed regret during a phone call with his U.S. counterpart Rex Tillerson about Washington’s decision, his ministry said.

“Moscow will closely study the new measures announced by the Americans, after which our reaction will be conveyed,” the Russian foreign ministry said in a statement.

To cope with the reduction in staff in Russia, the United States said last week it would have to sharply scale back visa services, a move that will hit Russian business travelers, tourists and students.

The Russian consulate in San Francisco handles work from seven states in the Western United States. There are three other Russian consulates separate from the embassy in Washington. They are in New York, Seattle and Houston.

Reporting by Yeganeh Torbati; editing by Grant McCool

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

[ad_2]

Source link

Kim Kardashian’s Best Friend Tells Her ‘Go F*** Yourself’



‘Kourtney & Khloe Take the Hamptons’: Kim Kardashian has a huge fight with her BFF about selling stories to the media. Subscribe! http://bit.ly/10cQZ5j Starring …

source

Mark Zuckerberg tells new daughter to play outside

[ad_1]

Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan, with their daughters August and MaximaImage copyright
Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook’s co-founder Mark Zuckerberg has urged his young daughter to play outside and enjoy the wonders of being a kid, in a heartfelt letter posted on his social media site.

The letter was published on Monday to announce the birth of his second child, August, with wife Priscilla Chan.

In the gushing missive, the parents speak about the magic of childhood and the importance of play.

The couple posted a similar letter to daughter Max in 2015.

The post, which appears alongside a family photo on Mr Zuckerberg’s Facebook page, encourages the new arrival not to “grow up too fast”.

“The world can be a serious place. That’s why it’s important to make time to go outside and play,” said the letter, signed “Mom and Dad”.

The call to discover a childhood outdoors is at odds with the aims of the billionaire’s social media empire.

Childhood ‘magical’

“I hope you run as many laps around our living room and yard as you want. And then I hope you take a lot of naps,” the parents wrote.

“Childhood is magical. You only get to be a child once, so don’t spend it worrying too much about the future,” they said.

It marks a lighter tone from the open letter written to welcome Max, which reflected on the problems facing younger generations and how technological progress will drive change.

At that time, the couple said they would donate their fortune to the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to make the world a better place for Max to grow up in.

The organisation has pledged billions of dollars to improve life for their children’s generation with goals such as eliminating disease.

But the parents wanted to shield their latest addition from these kinds of concerns, telling their daughter not to worry about the future, adding: “You’ve got us for that.”

“You will be busy when you’re older, so I hope you take time to smell all the flowers and put all the leaves you want in your bucket now,” they said.

[ad_2]

Source link

Uber HR tells employees that Khosrowshahi has been offered CEO role

[ad_1]


The news broke Sunday that Dara Khosrowshahi, CEO of Expedia has been offered the top job at Uber.

But it was unclear whether Khosrowshahi had accepted. Expedia Chairman Barry Diller said yesterday that he expected Khosrowshahi to take the job, but that it wasn’t finalized just yet.

And now JP Mangalindan from Yahoo Finance, our sister company, is reporting that Uber HR has told employees that the offer is official. He said they’ve been told that the formal announcement was delayed because Expedia is a public company. 

https://twitter.com/JPManga/status/902578451097333760

Up until Sunday, Khosrowshahi’s candidacy for the job had gone completely under the radar. Jeff Immelt and Meg Whitman had highly publicized discussions with the Uber board.

But the board which is dealing with lawsuits and other drama, apparently couldn’t agree on Immelt vs. Whitman, so they went with Khosrowshahi. The news of his offer has been well-received by insiders and the public at large.

We talked all about this on our latest Equity podcast episode with Menlo Venture’s Matt Murphy, one of Uber’s largest shareholders.

Featured Image: Skift

[ad_2]

Source link

Kendrick Lamar Tells Us Why He Loves Playing DAMN. In Reverse

[ad_1]

It’s been more than four months since Kendrick Lamar dropped DAMN., and we’re still peeling back the layers of his acclaimed fourth album.

Following DAMN.’s release, many fans speculated that there may be a second album or some kind of partner project in the works. Speaking with MTV News ahead of the VMAs — where he’s performing and nominated for eight awards on Sunday (August 27) — Kendrick said, “Any of my fans know that my albums get real intricate and there’s always details in there. For the most part, they usually have a good listening ear to figure out what’s going on.”

One of the most popular DAMN. hypotheses is that the album can be played in reverse order. Kendrick confirmed that long-held theory, explaining why he likes elements of that version better than the original.

“I think like a week after the album came out, [fans] realized you can play the album backwards,” he told MTV News correspondent Gaby Wilson. “It plays as a full story and even a better rhythm. It’s one of my favorite rhythms and tempos within the album. It’s something that we definitely premeditate while we’re in the studio.”

When you listen to DAMN. in reverse order, the album takes on a completely different sonic arc. But, as Kendrick explained, it’s not so much the actual narrative that changes.

“I don’t think the story necessarily changes, I think the feel changes,” he said. “The initial vibe listening from the top all the way to the bottom is … this aggression and this attitude. You know, ‘DNA,’ and exposing who I really am. You listen from the back end, and it’s almost the duality and the contrast of the intricate Kendrick Lamar. Both of these pieces are who I am.”

So there you have it — DAMN. in its original order is a must-listen, but hearing it in reverse will help you see both sides of the artist who loves to keep us on our toes.

Catch Kendrick’s must-see performance when the 2017 VMAs touch down at the Forum in Inglewood, California, on Sunday, August 27 at 8 p.m. ET/PT. See the full list of nominees and vote for Best New Artist now!

[ad_2]

Source link

‘Mary Tyler Moore’ writer tells all about her life among Hollywood’s A-listers

[ad_1]

When TV director Garry Marshall helped Susan Silver land a writing gig on a sitcom called “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” in 1971, she thought nothing about bringing the leading lady to life. 

“I thought I wasn’t allowed to make anything up,” Silver told Fox News. “That’s how naive I was. So I went in with stories from my own life. And they thought I was so brilliant! I wasn’t.”

Silver, one of the original writers behind the hit show about a news producer living in Minneapolis, relied on her own personal misadventures, which inspired new episodes. Silver insisted it worked because other women could easily identity with them. She described her tales in her new memoir, titled “Hot Pants in Hollywood.”

“Every woman I know loves their best friend more than anything, but you don’t necessarily want to have them in your workplace, too,” said Silver. “When Rhoda [Valerie Harper] lost her job and there was a position available at the station, Mary kind of hesitated… I think we all have those feelings. I just pitched stories from my own life.”

The one idea Silver did not come up with was the concept of having a character who was single.

“It started out that she was supposed to be divorced,” said Silver. “And the network said, ‘No, no, we can’t have a divorced woman because they’ll think she divorced [former co-star] Dick Van Dyke, because she had been the wife on ‘The Dick Van Dyke Show.’”

And not all of Silver’s past experiences made it on the screen. Before she took on the role, the comedy writer from Wisconsin attended UCLA where she befriend a poet who would go on to become a rock star.

“[Jim Morrison], he was my pal,” she described. “Jim Morrison was not the guy that we know from The Doors in college. He was very preppy… He had that little bowl haircut. He was very shy. He was a poet. And we used to hang out in the theater department of UCLA. He always had these poems.”

Silver recalled how Morrison befriended a biker name Max Schwartz, who ultimately became a prominent beatnik poet in San Francisco. She claimed it was Schwartz who inspired Morrison to take on a new look.

“[Schwartz] wore a lot of leather and had long hair,” she recalled. “I believe Jim took his persona, I really do. Because that’s the kind of persona he developed. He was so shy, quiet, and clean cut. But years later when I saw Jim at the Troubadour, it was like who’s that? It was another person.”

Silver also told us about an unwanted encounter with another future star. In 1963, a family friend, who was managing a new comedian named Bill Cosby, suggested he could drive her home after attending a party for “Hootenanny,” a musical variety show on ABC. It was one of Cosby’s first TV appearances. She revealed how Cosby seemed interested in giving her a chance to collaborate with him.

“He said, ‘I’ve just done my first album. Would you like to work on my second?’ I said, ‘Are you kidding? Of course I would,’” she said. “I was so excited. We got to my apartment and he lunged at me and I did the Lucille Ball, falling out of the car with my legs up in the air.

“And he just reached over, slammed the door, and drove away. So I escaped. I was very fortunate, knowing what we now know. [But] at the time, I thought, ‘Oh, he just tried to kiss me, so I got away…’ I was extraordinarily lucky.” 

It was also during her time at UCLA that Silver decided to get a job as an extra in the 1964 film “Viva Las Vegas” starring Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret. Silver appeared as a showgirl and it apparently impressed The King.

“Elvis always had these six guys hanging around him,” she said. “They came up to me the day after I was working there and they said, ‘Elvis is having a party tonight and he wants you to come.’ Oh my gosh, I was so excited.

“I think the party was at six so at 6:30 I drove up. I didn’t want to be the first one. The electric gate opened in Bel Air and there was only one car there, which was Elvis’ big Cadillac… I was so terrified I backed out of the driveway and went home. I was this little virgin from Wisconsin!”

Silver had better luck in 1965 when she was set up to go on a date with Lenny Bruce — by his own mother Sally Marr.

“It was a New Year’s Eve party and his mother, a stripper, this cute little woman, said, ‘Are you single? I want to fix you up with my son… I’ll call him, he’ll come to the party,'” she described.

Bruce did arrive and they instantly hit it off. She was even invited to see the controversial comedian perform, but was forced to be chaperoned by her uncle, a Hollywood writer.

“The three of us had a date,” said Silver. “He and my uncle got along beautifully… I only went on one date with him, but he was so brilliant and so amusing. He had beautiful eyes. He was very soulful. He was really good looking! I have a T-shirt [now] with his face on it… I didn’t go to bed with him then, but now I sleep with him occasionally at night. And it’s safer that way!”

Bruce passed away in 1966 at age 40 from a drug overdose.

Silver would go to carve out her own identity in Hollywood, writing for hit shows, such as “Square Pegs,” “Maude,” and “The Partridge Family,” among others. Still, her fondest memories come from getting to know the very private Moore, who later lived two doors down from her in New York City.

“She went out to dance every lunch hour,” said Silver. “She was such a perfectionist and so disciplined. She started as a dancer, so she did that all the time. She could have been a diva, but she never was. She really was the Mary you wanted her to be.”

Moore died earlier this year at age 80.

[ad_2]

Source link

‘Mary Tyler Moore’ writer tells all about her life among Hollywood’s A-listers

[ad_1]

When TV director Garry Marshall helped Susan Silver land a writing gig on a sitcom called “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” in 1971, she thought nothing about bringing the leading lady to life. 

“I thought I wasn’t allowed to make anything up,” Silver told Fox News. “That’s how naive I was. So I went in with stories from my own life. And they thought I was so brilliant! I wasn’t.”

Silver, one of the original writers behind the hit show about a news producer living in Minneapolis, relied on her own personal misadventures, which inspired new episodes. Silver insisted it worked because other women could easily identity with them. She described her tales in her new memoir, titled “Hot Pants in Hollywood.”

“Every woman I know loves their best friend more than anything, but you don’t necessarily want to have them in your workplace, too,” said Silver. “When Rhoda [Valerie Harper] lost her job and there was a position available at the station, Mary kind of hesitated… I think we all have those feelings. I just pitched stories from my own life.”

The one idea Silver did not come up with was the concept of having a character who was single.

“It started out that she was supposed to be divorced,” said Silver. “And the network said, ‘No, no, we can’t have a divorced woman because they’ll think she divorced [former co-star] Dick Van Dyke, because she had been the wife on ‘The Dick Van Dyke Show.’”

And not all of Silver’s past experiences made it on the screen. Before she took on the role, the comedy writer from Wisconsin attended UCLA where she befriend a poet who would go on to become a rock star.

“[Jim Morrison], he was my pal,” she described. “Jim Morrison was not the guy that we know from The Doors in college. He was very preppy… He had that little bowl haircut. He was very shy. He was a poet. And we used to hang out in the theater department of UCLA. He always had these poems.”

Silver recalled how Morrison befriended a biker name Max Schwartz, who ultimately became a prominent beatnik poet in San Francisco. She claimed it was Schwartz who inspired Morrison to take on a new look.

“[Schwartz] wore a lot of leather and had long hair,” she recalled. “I believe Jim took his persona, I really do. Because that’s the kind of persona he developed. He was so shy, quiet, and clean cut. But years later when I saw Jim at the Troubadour, it was like who’s that? It was another person.”

Silver also told us about an unwanted encounter with another future star. In 1963, a family friend, who was managing a new comedian named Bill Cosby, suggested he could drive her home after attending a party for “Hootenanny,” a musical variety show on ABC. It was one of Cosby’s first TV appearances. She revealed how Cosby seemed interested in giving her a chance to collaborate with him.

“He said, ‘I’ve just done my first album. Would you like to work on my second?’ I said, ‘Are you kidding? Of course I would,’” she said. “I was so excited. We got to my apartment and he lunged at me and I did the Lucille Ball, falling out of the car with my legs up in the air.

“And he just reached over, slammed the door, and drove away. So I escaped. I was very fortunate, knowing what we now know. [But] at the time, I thought, ‘Oh, he just tried to kiss me, so I got away…’ I was extraordinarily lucky.” 

It was also during her time at UCLA that Silver decided to get a job as an extra in the 1964 film “Viva Las Vegas” starring Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret. Silver appeared as a showgirl and it apparently impressed The King.

“Elvis always had these six guys hanging around him,” she said. “They came up to me the day after I was working there and they said, ‘Elvis is having a party tonight and he wants you to come.’ Oh my gosh, I was so excited.

“I think the party was at six so at 6:30 I drove up. I didn’t want to be the first one. The electric gate opened in Bel Air and there was only one car there, which was Elvis’ big Cadillac… I was so terrified I backed out of the driveway and went home. I was this little virgin from Wisconsin!”

Silver had better luck in 1965 when she was set up to go on a date with Lenny Bruce — by his own mother Sally Marr.

“It was a New Year’s Eve party and his mother, a stripper, this cute little woman, said, ‘Are you single? I want to fix you up with my son… I’ll call him, he’ll come to the party,'” she described.

Bruce did arrive and they instantly hit it off. She was even invited to see the controversial comedian perform, but was forced to be chaperoned by her uncle, a Hollywood writer.

“The three of us had a date,” said Silver. “He and my uncle got along beautifully… I only went on one date with him, but he was so brilliant and so amusing. He had beautiful eyes. He was very soulful. He was really good looking! I have a T-shirt [now] with his face on it… I didn’t go to bed with him then, but now I sleep with him occasionally at night. And it’s safer that way!”

Bruce passed away in 1966 at age 40 from a drug overdose.

Silver would go to carve out her own identity in Hollywood, writing for hit shows, such as “Square Pegs,” “Maude,” and “The Partridge Family,” among others. Still, her fondest memories come from getting to know the very private Moore, who later lived two doors down from her in New York City.

“She went out to dance every lunch hour,” said Silver. “She was such a perfectionist and so disciplined. She started as a dancer, so she did that all the time. She could have been a diva, but she never was. She really was the Mary you wanted her to be.”

Moore died earlier this year at age 80.

[ad_2]

Source link

NYC man tells woman ‘I’m going to push you’ then knocks her onto subway tracks, police say

[ad_1]

An unidentified man who told a woman “I’m going to push you” later pushed her onto the tracks at a New York City subway station Tuesday night.

The 49-year-old woman, who was also not identified, was standing on the platform waiting for an F train in the East Village when a young man walked behind her and pushed her, police said.

The suspect told the victim “I’m going to push you” and then knocked the woman onto the subway path, NBC New York reported. The suspect was described as being in his 20s and wearing dark colored clothes.

NEW YORK CITY WOMAN, 33, PLUNGES TO DEATH AFTER REPORTED ARGUMENT WITH HER BOYFRIEND

The woman was helped by a few passersby who pulled her up from the tracks. There was no train nearby at the time of her fall, authorities said.

The victim was hospitalized with a cut on her head and was said to be in serious but stable condition.

[ad_2]

Source link