Oxford tourist falls to death at Indian temple

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Roger StotesburyImage copyright
Roger Stotesbury/ PA Wire

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Roger Stotesbury was on a “middle-aged gap year” with his wife Hilary and they were due to return home this month

A British man has fallen to his death while taking photos at a temple in India during a year-long world trip.

Roger Stotesbury, 56, was visiting Orchha, in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, with his wife Hilary on Friday when he plummeted 30ft (9m) from the Laxmi Narayan temple.

The couple, from Oxford, were blogging about their “middle-aged gap year”.

The Foreign Office said it was providing assistance to the family of a British man following his death.

‘Devoted couple’

Mr Stotesbury’s family said the father of two had just finished taking shots of the scenery from the 17th Century temple, about 160 miles south of the Taj Mahal.

The couple had been due to return to the UK this month, after completing their India trip.

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Vinod Shenoy

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Mr Stotesbury was taking photos on first floor of the Laxmi Narayan temple when he fell 30ft

A family spokesman said: “They were the most happily married couple I have ever known. They were just so devoted to each other.

“Roger took lots and lots of photographs, and he had gone to take some views from the temple.

“He put his equipment down and then he fell.”

On their blog, Mr Stotesbury wrote that his motto was to “die young as late as possible”.

The couple also wrote: “We took the view that on your deathbed you never wish you’d spent more time in the office.

“We’ve seen our two kids off into the wider world and we have no more caring responsibilities for our parents.

“So we thought now is the time to take a gap year and travel whilst we still have the health and energy. After all you only live once.”

In a statement issued on their behalf by the Foreign Office, his family said: “Roger Stotesbury was one of the most enthusiastic men who walked the planet, and was incredibly loved by his wife, children and the surrounding community.

“He brightened every room he entered. He and his wife, Hilary had planned their round-the-world gap year since the beginning of 2016 and set off on 1 November last year.

“They loved the last 11-and-a-half months of energetic travel, exploring from the bottom tip of Patagonia, right up through the Americas, to Canada, Australia, China, Japan, Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia and finally India.”

A Foreign Office spokesman said: “We are providing assistance to the family of a British man following his tragic death in India on 13 October.

“Our thoughts are with the family at this sad time.”

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India guru rape: Inside huge temple complex

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A controversial Indian guru convicted of rape has been sentenced to 20 years in prison.

Self-styled holy man Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh was found guilty of sexually assaulting two female followers on Friday in Panchkula.

His followers rioted after the verdict, leaving 38 dead.

Forty thousand people worship at his sprawling temple complex, which includes its own hospital and hotel.

The BBC’s Justin Rowlatt has been inside.

Produced by Shalu Yadav, filmed and edited by Varun Nayar

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Bollywood Actor Shahrukh Khan Along With His Son Abram Visit and Pray at Golden Temple



Bollywood Actor Shahrukh Khan Along With His Son Abram Visit and Pray at Golden Temple Amritsar.

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BIGGEST HINDU TEMPLE IN WORLD TOP 10 LIST 2017



A Hindu temple or mandir is a structure designed to bring human beings and gods together, using symbolism to express the ideas and beliefs of Hinduism.[2] The symbolism and structure of a Hindu temple are rooted in Vedic traditions.[2] A temple incorporates all elements of Hindu cosmos – presenting the good, the evil and the human, as well as the elements of Hindu sense of cyclic time and the essence of life – symbolically presenting dharma, kama, artha, moksa, and karma.[3][4]

The spiritual principles symbolically represented in Hindu temples are given in the ancient Sanskrit texts of India (for example, Vedas and Upanishads), while their structural rules are described in various ancient Sanskrit treatises on architecture (Brhat Samhita, Vastu Sastras).[5][6] The layout, the motifs, the plan and the building process recite ancient rituals, geometric symbolisms, and reflect beliefs and values innate within various schools of Hinduism.[2] A Hindu temple is a spiritual destination for many Hindus, as well as landmarks around which ancient arts, community celebrations and economy have flourished.[7][8]

Hindu temples come in many styles, are situated in diverse locations, deploy different construction methods and are adapted to different deities and regional beliefs,[9] yet almost all of them share certain core ideas, symbolism and themes. They are found in South Asia particularly India and Nepal, in southeast Asian countries such as Cambodia, Vietnam and islands of Indonesia and Malaysia[10][11] and countries such as Fiji, Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, the Caribbean, Suriname, South Africa, Europe and North America with a significant Hindu community.[12] The current state and outer appearance of Hindu temples reflect arts, materials and designs as they evolved over several millennia; they also reflect the effect of conflicts between Hinduism and Islam since the 12th century.[13] The Swaminarayanan Akshardham in Robbinsville, New Jersey, United States, within the New York City Metropolitan Area, was inaugurated in 2014 as the world’s largest Hindu temple.[1]

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